The WordPress Chick Podcast http://thewpchick.com/podcast/ Kim Doyal, “The WordPress Chick” shares her journey in the world of blogging, life and entrepreneurship on the internet. Sit back, relax and enjoy the ride while Kim discusses her insights on crafting the business and life you want using her platform of choice, WordPress. Whether you’re new to WordPress or consider yourself a more advanced user, these blog building and online tips will make you more successful with your business. Kim is widely known for being “authentic” and connecting with her audience in a fun and informative way that will keep you coming back for each new episode. Kim is totally self-taught when it comes to WordPress and has been making her living online for the past 5 years. She is a published author, movie producer, artist, and has the best cartoon voice you’ll ever hear on a podcast! Her motto is Tue, 23 May 2017 17:28:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 Kim Doyal, “The WordPress Chick” shares her journey in the world of blogging, life and entrepreneurship on the internet. Sit back, relax and enjoy the ride while Kim discusses her insights on crafting the business and life you want using her platform of choice, WordPress. Whether you're new to WordPress or consider yourself a more advanced user, these blog building and online tips will make you more successful with your business. Kim is widely known for being “authentic” and connecting with her audience in a fun and informative way that will keep you coming back for each new episode. Kim is totally self-taught when it comes to WordPress and has been making her living online for the past 8 years. She is a published author, movie producer, artist, and has the best cartoon voice you’ll ever hear on a podcast! Her motto is,WordPress Happiness Made Easy, and Kim will teach you her best tips on digital publishing, blogging, WordPress and making a living online. Other topics include making WordPress simple and easy to use, WordPress themes, WordPress plugins, publishing tips, online video, outsourcing, making business fun again as well as how to make more money with your online business. Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick kimdoyal@comcast.net kimdoyal@comcast.net (Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick) Kim Doyal - The WordPress Chick WordPress Happiness Made Easy The WordPress Chick Podcast http://s3.amazonaws.com/wpchick-podcast/WordPress-Chick-Podcast.jpg http://thewpchick.com/podcast/ Brentwood, California weekly Ready to Write? Online Book Summit with Jesse Krieger WPCP: 148 https://thewpchick.com/ready-to-write-online-book-summit-with-jesse-krieger-wpcp-148/ Thu, 18 May 2017 21:10:31 +0000 https://thewpchick.com/?p=20583 This episode is sponsored by my awesome web host, LiquidWeb. I've wanted to write a book for a while now. My guess is that many of you have thought of writing a book too, but the thought of it seems a little overwhelming or you're not sure where to start. The first time I thought of writing a book was probably a couple years into my business when I had gotten to the other side of some very difficult times in my life. I was (and still am), in awe of all the possibilities the internet provides. As someone who has been an avid reader my entire life (and spent 10 years in the book industry), the stories of inspiration and hope drive me the most (and yes, I love a good novel too). This is why we love the 'hero's journey', isn't it? As entrepreneur's, we all feel that "call to adventure" (the first step in the hero's journey, thank you, Joseph Campbell). Which is also why I was excited to talk to Jesse Krieger, of Entrepreneur's Press. Jesse's own story is full of adventure, challenges, and opportunities. Which all led him to create his publishing company that helps entrepreneurs get their message out to the world through publishing their own books. Before you jump into the interview, make sure to sign up for the free online book summit: Sign up for the online book summit here Questions I Asked Jesse Before we get into the publishing side of your business, you have a fascinating background! Can you share your journey from musician, to USB store owner to Lifestyle Entrepreneurs Press (before you published your first book)? Let’s talk about your first book, Lifestyle Entrepreneur. What was it about and how did it come about? When did you decide to go all in with helping entrepreneurs become published authors? I'm sure a lot of people would like to write a book but think they don’t have it in them or aren’t sure about whether it’s worth the time and energy. What are your thoughts? I spent 10 years in the book industry and am a huge reader… there are books on every topic imaginable. How do you guide clients who think their market wouldn’t really be served by a book? What are some of the benefits of having a book? I would assume that the promotion is as important as the production. What should someone know about the promotion side of things? What You're Going to Learn How Jesse's career as a musician led him to Southeast Asia How he got his first book published in Malaysia The difference between the publishing world in Asia and the U.S. and what his book tour was like How he launched his company, Lifestyle Entrepreneurs Press How you can write a book, even if you're not sure where to start The different ways you can get your book written How to join Jesse's free online book summit Where to Connect with Jesse Website | Twitter | Facebook Jesse Krieger

This episode is sponsored by my awesome web host, LiquidWeb.

LiquidWeb Managed WordPress Hosting

I’ve wanted to write a book for a while now.

My guess is that many of you have thought of writing a book too, but the thought of it seems a little overwhelming or you’re not sure where to start.

The first time I thought of writing a book was probably a couple years into my business when I had gotten to the other side of some very difficult times in my life. I was (and still am), in awe of all the possibilities the internet provides.

As someone who has been an avid reader my entire life (and spent 10 years in the book industry), the stories of inspiration and hope drive me the most (and yes, I love a good novel too).

This is why we love the ‘hero’s journey’, isn’t it?

As entrepreneur’s, we all feel that “call to adventure” (the first step in the hero’s journey, thank you, Joseph Campbell).

Which is also why I was excited to talk to Jesse Krieger, of Entrepreneur’s Press. Jesse’s own story is full of adventure, challenges, and opportunities. Which all led him to create his publishing company that helps entrepreneurs get their message out to the world through publishing their own books.

Before you jump into the interview, make sure to sign up for the free online book summit:Jesse Krieger

Sign up for the online book summit here

Questions I Asked Jesse

  1. Before we get into the publishing side of your business, you have a fascinating background! Can you share your journey from musician, to USB store owner to Lifestyle Entrepreneurs Press (before you published your first book)?

  2. Let’s talk about your first book, Lifestyle Entrepreneur. What was it about and how did it come about?

  3. When did you decide to go all in with helping entrepreneurs become published authors?

  4. I’m sure a lot of people would like to write a book but think they don’t have it in them or aren’t sure about whether it’s worth the time and energy. What are your thoughts?

  5. I spent 10 years in the book industry and am a huge reader… there are books on every topic imaginable. How do you guide clients who think their market wouldn’t really be served by a book?

  6. What are some of the benefits of having a book?

  7. I would assume that the promotion is as important as the production. What should someone know about the promotion side of things?

What You’re Going to Learn

  • How Jesse’s career as a musician led him to Southeast Asia
  • How he got his first book published in Malaysia
  • The difference between the publishing world in Asia and the U.S. and what his book tour was like
  • How he launched his company, Lifestyle Entrepreneurs Press
  • How you can write a book, even if you’re not sure where to start
  • The different ways you can get your book written
  • How to join Jesse’s free online book summit

Where to Connect with Jesse

Website | Twitter | Facebook

]]>
This episode is sponsored by my awesome web host, LiquidWeb. - I've wanted to write a book for a while now. - My guess is that many of you have thought of writing a book too, but the thought of it seems a little overwhelming or you're not sure wh... This episode is sponsored by my awesome web host, LiquidWeb.



I've wanted to write a book for a while now.

My guess is that many of you have thought of writing a book too, but the thought of it seems a little overwhelming or you're not sure where to start.

The first time I thought of writing a book was probably a couple years into my business when I had gotten to the other side of some very difficult times in my life. I was (and still am), in awe of all the possibilities the internet provides.

As someone who has been an avid reader my entire life (and spent 10 years in the book industry), the stories of inspiration and hope drive me the most (and yes, I love a good novel too).

This is why we love the 'hero's journey', isn't it?

As entrepreneur's, we all feel that "call to adventure" (the first step in the hero's journey, thank you, Joseph Campbell).

Which is also why I was excited to talk to Jesse Krieger, of Entrepreneur's Press. Jesse's own story is full of adventure, challenges, and opportunities. Which all led him to create his publishing company that helps entrepreneurs get their message out to the world through publishing their own books.

Before you jump into the interview, make sure to sign up for the free online book summit:

Sign up for the online book summit here

Questions I Asked Jesse

*
Before we get into the publishing side of your business, you have a fascinating background! Can you share your journey from musician, to USB store owner to Lifestyle Entrepreneurs Press (before you published your first book)?

*
Let’s talk about your first book, Lifestyle Entrepreneur. What was it about and how did it come about?

*
When did you decide to go all in with helping entrepreneurs become published authors?

*
I'm sure a lot of people would like to write a book but think they don’t have it in them or aren’t sure about whether it’s worth the time and energy. What are your thoughts?

*
I spent 10 years in the book industry and am a huge reader… there are books on every topic imaginable. How do you guide clients who think their market wouldn’t really be served by a book?

*
What are some of the benefits of having a book?

*
I would assume that the promotion is as important as the production. What should someone know about the promotion side of things?




What You're Going to Learn

* How Jesse's career as a musician led him to Southeast Asia
* How he got his first book published in Malaysia
* The difference between the publishing world in Asia and the U.S. and what his book tour was like
* How he launched his company, Lifestyle Entrepreneurs Press
* How you can write a book, even if you're not sure where to start
* The different ways you can get your book written
* How to join Jesse's free online book summit






Where to Connect with Jesse
Website | Twitter | Facebook]]>
Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 52:23
SEO for Growth with Phil Singleton WPCP: 147 https://thewpchick.com/seo-for-growth-with-phil-singleton-wpcp-147/ Thu, 11 May 2017 20:57:48 +0000 https://thewpchick.com/?p=20400 Thank you to my sponsor and awesome web host, LiquidWeb for sponsoring this episode. I wish I could tell you that SEO was something I got excited about. For me, it's one of those necessary evils. Over the years I've gotten better at it (although I'm still not a fan of keyword research... also a necessary evil, but all worth the time and effort) and can see the results of my efforts. All of that was before I connected with Phil Singleton, one of the authors of SEO for Growth. Phil got me to think of SEO in a whole new way. Mainly because he believes that SEO isn't simply the tactics that have been used. It's the bigger picture. SEO for Growth incorporates content marketing and social media (and we all know how I feel about content, don't we?). I could have talked to Phil for hours... not only is he a great guest with a ton of energy, he's like this massive wealth of knowledge. You're definitely going to want to take notes or at least download the transcripts (you can grab them at the end of the post, I've got an opt-in for you to get them). Questions I Asked Phil First, you’ve had a pretty fascinating career that led to your SEO path. Can you share that journey with the listeners? Since we can’t cover the entire book in an hour (and want people to buy the book anyways), there are a few things I picked out that I thought would be most helpful for my audience. A little basic question, but can you explain inbound marketing? You talk about why 99% of websites fail. Are there a couple common things you see a lot of people doing? Can you help me get over my hatred of keyword research? Are there a couple tips or best practices you can share about link building? I know I personally don’t have a solid strategy for this because I’m not exactly sure where to start. How does social media tie in with SEO? I’m a huge fan of creating, producing content. I still see so many people struggle with this. Any advice? What You're Going to Learn How working overseas and learning Mandarin led Phil towards entrepreneurship and owning his own agency Why Phil thinks podcasting is one of the most over-looked opportunities for SEO Phil's opinion on guest posting (hint: it's not dead and is still a great way to build quality links) Why web designers have a huge opportunity right now How to leverage relationships and influencers for SEO and traffic How they used influencers to amplify the book marketing How social media works with SEO (despite what Google says or doesn't say) Get SEO for Growth  Where to Connect with Phil Website | Facebook | Twitter Links from this episode SEO for Growth website Chief Marketing Officers at Work - Josh Steimle Anne Handley  SEO for Growth

Thank you to my sponsor and awesome web host, LiquidWeb for sponsoring this episode.

LiquidWeb Managed WordPress Hosting

I wish I could tell you that SEO was something I got excited about.

For me, it’s one of those necessary evils. Over the years I’ve gotten better at it (although I’m still not a fan of keyword research… also a necessary evil, but all worth the time and effort) and can see the results of my efforts.

All of that was before I connected with Phil Singleton, one of the authors of SEO for Growth.

Phil got me to think of SEO in a whole new way.Phil Singleton

Mainly because he believes that SEO isn’t simply the tactics that have been used. It’s the bigger picture. SEO for Growth incorporates content marketing and social media (and we all know how I feel about content, don’t we?). I could have talked to Phil for hours… not only is he a great guest with a ton of energy, he’s like this massive wealth of knowledge. You’re definitely going to want to take notes or at least download the transcripts (you can grab them at the end of the post, I’ve got an opt-in for you to get them).

Questions I Asked Phil

  1. First, you’ve had a pretty fascinating career that led to your SEO path. Can you share that journey with the listeners?

  2. Since we can’t cover the entire book in an hour (and want people to buy the book anyways), there are a few things I picked out that I thought would be most helpful for my audience. A little basic question, but can you explain inbound marketing?

  3. You talk about why 99% of websites fail. Are there a couple common things you see a lot of people doing?

  4. Can you help me get over my hatred of keyword research?

  5. Are there a couple tips or best practices you can share about link building? I know I personally don’t have a solid strategy for this because I’m not exactly sure where to start.

  6. How does social media tie in with SEO?

  7. I’m a huge fan of creating, producing content. I still see so many people struggle with this. Any advice?

What You’re Going to Learn

  • How working overseas and learning Mandarin led Phil towards entrepreneurship and owning his own agency
  • Why Phil thinks podcasting is one of the most over-looked opportunities for SEO
  • Phil’s opinion on guest posting (hint: it’s not dead and is still a great way to build quality links)
  • Why web designers have a huge opportunity right now
  • How to leverage relationships and influencers for SEO and traffic
  • How they used influencers to amplify the book marketing
  • How social media works with SEO (despite what Google says or doesn’t say)

Get SEO for Growth 

SEO for Growth

Where to Connect with Phil

Website | Facebook | Twitter

Links from this episode

SEO for Growth website

Chief Marketing Officers at Work – Josh Steimle

Anne Handley 

]]>
Thank you to my sponsor and awesome web host, LiquidWeb for sponsoring this episode. I wish I could tell you that SEO was something I got excited about. For me, it's one of those necessary evils. Over the years I've gotten better at it (although ... Thank you to my sponsor and awesome web host, LiquidWeb for sponsoring this episode.


I wish I could tell you that SEO was something I got excited about.
For me, it's one of those necessary evils. Over the years I've gotten better at it (although I'm still not a fan of keyword research... also a necessary evil, but all worth the time and effort) and can see the results of my efforts.

All of that was before I connected with Phil Singleton, one of the authors of SEO for Growth.
Phil got me to think of SEO in a whole new way.

Mainly because he believes that SEO isn't simply the tactics that have been used. It's the bigger picture. SEO for Growth incorporates content marketing and social media (and we all know how I feel about content, don't we?). I could have talked to Phil for hours... not only is he a great guest with a ton of energy, he's like this massive wealth of knowledge. You're definitely going to want to take notes or at least download the transcripts (you can grab them at the end of the post, I've got an opt-in for you to get them).



Questions I Asked Phil

*
First, you’ve had a pretty fascinating career that led to your SEO path. Can you share that journey with the listeners?

*
Since we can’t cover the entire book in an hour (and want people to buy the book anyways), there are a few things I picked out that I thought would be most helpful for my audience. A little basic question, but can you explain inbound marketing?

*
You talk about why 99% of websites fail. Are there a couple common things you see a lot of people doing?

*
Can you help me get over my hatred of keyword research?

*
Are there a couple tips or best practices you can share about link building? I know I personally don’t have a solid strategy for this because I’m not exactly sure where to start.

*
How does social media tie in with SEO?

*
I’m a huge fan of creating, producing content. I still see so many people struggle with this. Any advice?




What You're Going to Learn

* How working overseas and learning Mandarin led Phil towards entrepreneurship and owning his own agency
* Why Phil thinks podcasting is one of the most over-looked opportunities for SEO
* Phil's opinion on guest posting (hint: it's not dead and is still a great way to build quality links)
* Why web designers have a huge opportunity right now
* How to leverage relationships and influencers for SEO and traffic
* How they used influencers to amplify the book marketing
* How social media works with SEO (despite what Google says or doesn't say)


Get SEO for Growth 

Where to Connect with Phil
Website | Facebook | Twitter



Links from this episode
SEO for Growth website
https://thewpchick.com/?p=20373 Thanks to LiquidWeb for sponsoring this episode of The WordPress Chick Podcast After years of having a team for development, I knew it was time to get some help to speed up my site. I'd done plenty of things on my own (caching, CDN, deleting plugins, etc.), but the truth is this isn't my wheelhouse. And I had zero desire to learn how to do these things. Since I've been publishing a lot more content and putting a conscious effort into driving traffic to my site I knew I needed to optimize it. I also wanted someone to go through things that may have been done quickly as opposed to correctly and clean up things (this sounds so ambiguous as I'm writing it, but trust me, I had a plan). The first thing I thought was that I would go to WPCurve. Then realized I couldn't... when I wanted to sign up they weren't taking new customers due to the recent acquisition by GoDaddy. Hmm... fortunately, I happen to be in a private Facebook Group and someone had posted a request for a review of their site, ValiusWP. I don't remember exactly what the question about their site was but when I saw that they offered WordPress support I went instantly over to the site (talk about the power of sharing in Facebook Groups, right?). I signed up for the plan that included site optimization. Hallelujah! My site speed increased by a couple seconds... WOOHOO! Each week I get a website care report that lists: Massive peace of mind. Their support is amazing (during normal business hours I get a response in less than 15 min? Usually sooner). I knew I wanted to have them on the podcast to spread the word (I've already referred a couple friends). If you're considering looking for support for your site (unlimited small jobs), look no further. Questions I Asked Steven What were you & Kolby (his business partner) doing before launching WP Valius? Where did the name come from? How did you and Kolby connect? What made you decide to launch a subscription model support company? What are some of the common things people request help for? I signed up for the site optimization and LOVE it. What are the biggest issues you see with site optimization? How's the growth and marketing for the company going? What You're Going to Learn How quickly they got up and running with their support model How they approached pricing How big their team is Some of the most common issues people have What defines a 'small job' (unlimited 3o minute tasks) Which plugins they use (they have a basic plugin library) How you can get started with ValiusWP Where to Connect with Steven & ValiusWP Website | Twitter | Facebook ValiusWP

Thanks to LiquidWeb for sponsoring this episode of The WordPress Chick Podcast

LiquidWeb-Managed-WordPress-Hosting

After years of having a team for development, I knew it was time to get some help to speed up my site.

I’d done plenty of things on my own (caching, CDN, deleting plugins, etc.), but the truth is this isn’t my wheelhouse. And I had zero desire to learn how to do these things.

Since I’ve been publishing a lot more content and putting a conscious effort into driving traffic to my site I knew I needed to optimize it. I also wanted someone to go through things that may have been done quickly as opposed to correctly and clean up things (this sounds so ambiguous as I’m writing it, but trust me, I had a plan).

The first thing I thought was that I would go to WPCurve.

Then realized I couldn’t… when I wanted to sign up they weren’t taking new customers due to the recent acquisition by GoDaddy.

Hmm… fortunately, I happen to be in a private Facebook Group and someone had posted a request for a review of their site, ValiusWP. I don’t remember exactly what the question about their site was but when I saw that they offered WordPress support I went instantly over to the site (talk about the power of sharing in Facebook Groups, right?).

I signed up for the plan that included site optimization.

Hallelujah!

My site speed increased by a couple seconds… WOOHOO!

Each week I get a website care report that lists:

Massive peace of mind.Steven Kaufman

Their support is amazing (during normal business hours I get a response in less than 15 min? Usually sooner). I knew I wanted to have them on the podcast to spread the word (I’ve already referred a couple friends). If you’re considering looking for support for your site (unlimited small jobs), look no further.

Questions I Asked Steven

  1. What were you & Kolby (his business partner) doing before launching WP Valius?
  2. Where did the name come from?
  3. How did you and Kolby connect?
  4. What made you decide to launch a subscription model support company?
  5. What are some of the common things people request help for?
  6. I signed up for the site optimization and LOVE it. What are the biggest issues you see with site optimization?
  7. How’s the growth and marketing for the company going?

ValiusWP

What You’re Going to Learn

  • How quickly they got up and running with their support model
  • How they approached pricing
  • How big their team is
  • Some of the most common issues people have
  • What defines a ‘small job’ (unlimited 3o minute tasks)
  • Which plugins they use (they have a basic plugin library)
  • How you can get started with ValiusWP

Where to Connect with Steven & ValiusWP

Website | Twitter | Facebook

]]> Thanks to LiquidWeb for sponsoring this episode of The WordPress Chick Podcast After years of having a team for development, I knew it was time to get some help to speed up my site. I'd done plenty of things on my own (caching, CDN,
Thanks to LiquidWeb for sponsoring this episode of The WordPress Chick Podcast


After years of having a team for development, I knew it was time to get some help to speed up my site.
I'd done plenty of things on my own (caching, CDN, deleting plugins, etc.), but the truth is this isn't my wheelhouse. And I had zero desire to learn how to do these things.
Since I've been publishing a lot more content and putting a conscious effort into driving traffic to my site I knew I needed to optimize it. I also wanted someone to go through things that may have been done quickly as opposed to correctly and clean up things (this sounds so ambiguous as I'm writing it, but trust me, I had a plan).
The first thing I thought was that I would go to WPCurve.
Then realized I couldn't... when I wanted to sign up they weren't taking new customers due to the recent acquisition by GoDaddy.
Hmm... fortunately, I happen to be in a private Facebook Group and someone had posted a request for a review of their site, ValiusWP. I don't remember exactly what the question about their site was but when I saw that they offered WordPress support I went instantly over to the site (talk about the power of sharing in Facebook Groups, right?).
I signed up for the plan that included site optimization.
Hallelujah!
My site speed increased by a couple seconds... WOOHOO!
Each week I get a website care report that lists:

Massive peace of mind.
Their support is amazing (during normal business hours I get a response in less than 15 min? Usually sooner). I knew I wanted to have them on the podcast to spread the word (I've already referred a couple friends). If you're considering looking for support for your site (unlimited small jobs), look no further.
Questions I Asked Steven


What were you & Kolby (his business partner) doing before launching WP Valius?
Where did the name come from?
How did you and Kolby connect?
What made you decide to launch a subscription model support company?
What are some of the common things people request help for?
I signed up for the site optimization and LOVE it. What are the biggest issues you see with site optimization?
How's the growth and marketing for the company going?



What You're Going to Learn

* How quickly they got up and running with their support model
* How they approached pricing
* How big their team is
* Some of the most common issues people have
* What defines a 'small job' (unlimited 3o minute tasks)
* Which plugins they use (they have a basic plugin library)
* How you can get started with ValiusWP

Where to Connect with Steven & ValiusWP
Website | Twitter | Facebook]]>
Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 43:44
The Hype Has Worn Out Its Welcome & A Few Predictions WPCP: 145 https://thewpchick.com/the-hype-has-worn-out-its-welcome-personally-im-thrilled-wpcp-145/ Fri, 28 Apr 2017 15:00:47 +0000 https://thewpchick.com/?p=20053 This episode is sponsored by LiquidWeb... Managed WordPress Hosting Done Right (my words). One of my favorite non-fiction books of all time is 'The Obstacle is The Way" by Ryan Holiday. Last year he released "Ego is the Enemy", which comes as a close second. What do I love so much about these books? The stories. True stories. Of people who have come before us, faced adversity, lived by their convictions, and stood for something. Having been born in San Francisco (a 5th generation) and raised a 49er fan, it didn't come as much of a surprise when Ryan referenced the late, great Bill Walsh. I'm not about to start spewing NFL statistics, but I don't think there are many people that would argue if I said Bill Walsh was one of the game's greatest coaches. Of all time. Here's why Ryan Holiday was so influenced by Bill Walsh's book, The Score Takes Care of Itself. "Walsh took the 49ers from the worst team in football to the Super Bowl in less than 3 years. How? Not with a grand vision or pure ambition, but with what he called the Standard of Performance. That is: How to practice. How to dress. How to hold the ball. Where to be on a play down the very inch. Which skills mattered for each position. How much effort to give. By upholding these standards—whatever they happen to be for your chosen craft—success will take care of itself." -Ryan Holiday (from his post, Books to Base Your Life On) What do these books have to do with online marketing? Everything. When you hear the term 'internet marketing' does your mind automatically go to images of young guys posing in front of Ferrari's, mansions, yachts, and all their friends living the 'laptop lifestyle'? Yea. Me too. Before I come off like a complete hypocrite, I will say that I bought into the 'laptop lifestyle' for a bit. When I was part of the mastermind for a couple years I thought that meant you were successful. It was almost as though if you were showing your fabulous lifestyle then you weren't successful. No one told me I needed to buy into this, I went willingly. Why? Because I didn't trust myself. I didn't trust that how I wanted to live my life, what type of business I wanted and getting there on my own terms was enough. I had some success, but it wasn't sustainable. I was spending a lot of money in hopes of making a lot of money. It was exhausting. I had some amazing experiences, met some wonderful people and learned a lot. It was because of the mastermind that I started paid traffic (Facebook ads). I also learned how I didn't want to run my business. I also learned how I didn't want to run my business. After a very busy 2015, I needed to take a break. Regroup. I realized with all the travel I did for business in 2015 I didn't feel energized. I felt drained (none of the trips were restful or a vacation). Which is why it's refreshing to see the 'laptop lifestyle' on its way out. I was talking with a friend last week who is involved in Facebook advertising and she said that the ads that used to work on Facebook (flashy cars, expensive lifestyle) are no longer working. Can I get an AMEN?! I love that the push for a certain lifestyle has worn out it's welcome. I think we've all grown weary of what we see online... the pictures that show the fabulous life, the perfect family, the amazing trips, etc. Not that those things don't deserve to be celebrated because they do. When you work hard for something you absolutely should celebrate it. But those are moments, not our lives. And it's vitally important that we learn to keep those moments in perspective. If the 'amazing' moments carry so much weight in our lives how do we feel when we're not living in a constant state of awesomeness? Do we appreciate the day to day goodness in our lives? Or are we constantly in a state of never being happy with where we are. I know that's exactly what happened for me. No matter what I was doing, Hype

This episode is sponsored by LiquidWeb... Managed WordPress Hosting Done Right (my words).

LiquidWeb Managed WordPress Hosting

One of my favorite non-fiction books of all time is ‘The Obstacle is The Way” by Ryan Holiday. Last year he released “Ego is the Enemy“, which comes as a close second.

What do I love so much about these books?

The stories.

True stories.

Of people who have come before us, faced adversity, lived by their convictions, and stood for something. Having been born in San Francisco (a 5th generation) and raised a 49er fan, it didn’t come as much of a surprise when Ryan referenced the late, great Bill Walsh.

I’m not about to start spewing NFL statistics, but I don’t think there are many people that would argue if I said Bill Walsh was one of the game’s greatest coaches. Of all time.

Here’s why Ryan Holiday was so influenced by Bill Walsh’s book, The Score Takes Care of Itself.

“Walsh took the 49ers from the worst team in football to the Super Bowl in less than 3 years. How? Not with a grand vision or pure ambition, but with what he called the Standard of Performance. That is: How to practice. How to dress. How to hold the ball. Where to be on a play down the very inch. Which skills mattered for each position. How much effort to give. By upholding these standards—whatever they happen to be for your chosen craft—success will take care of itself.”
-Ryan Holiday (from his post, Books to Base Your Life On)

What do these books have to do with online marketing?

Everything.

When you hear the term ‘internet marketing’ does your mind automatically go to images of young guys posing in front of Ferrari’s, mansions, yachts, and all their friends living the ‘laptop lifestyle’?

Yea.

Me too.

Before I come off like a complete hypocrite, I will say that I bought into the ‘laptop lifestyle’ for a bit. When I was part of the mastermind for a couple years I thought that meant you were successful. It was almost as though if you were showing your fabulous lifestyle then you weren’t successful.

No one told me I needed to buy into this, I went willingly.

Why?

Because I didn’t trust myself. I didn’t trust that how I wanted to live my life, what type of business I wanted and getting there on my own terms was enough.

I had some success, but it wasn’t sustainable.

I was spending a lot of money in hopes of making a lot of money.

It was exhausting.

I had some amazing experiences, met some wonderful people and learned a lot. It was because of the mastermind that I started paid traffic (Facebook ads). I also learned how I didn’t want to run my business.

I also learned how I didn’t want to run my business.

After a very busy 2015, I needed to take a break. Regroup. I realized with all the travel I did for business in 2015 I didn’t feel energized.

I felt drained (none of the trips were restful or a vacation).

Which is why it’s refreshing to see the ‘laptop lifestyle’ on its way out.

I was talking with a friend last week who is involved in Facebook advertising and she said that the ads that used to work on Facebook (flashy cars, expensive lifestyle) are no longer working.

Can I get an AMEN?!

I love that the push for a certain lifestyle has worn out it’s welcome. I think we’ve all grown weary of what we see online… the pictures that show the fabulous life, the perfect family, the amazing trips, etc. Not that those things don’t deserve to be celebrated because they do. When you work hard for something you absolutely should celebrate it. But those are moments, not our lives. And it’s vitally important that we learn to keep those moments in perspective. If the ‘amazing’ moments carry so much weight in our lives how do we feel when we’re not living in a constant state of awesomeness?

Do we appreciate the day to day goodness in our lives?

Or are we constantly in a state of never being happy with where we are.

I know that’s exactly what happened for me.

No matter what I was doing, or how hard I was working, it wasn’t enough.

On the flip side of this, I will never understand the people who spew every miserable detail of their personal struggles online either. Not because I don’t want to see it (although I don’t), but because after all is said and done, I doubt doing this ever helps them feel better. I would guess it keeps them stuck in the thick of their problems, all the while creating more problems by virtually dumping them out for the world to see.

My Predictions for the Online Marketing Space

I’d like to think that I have a somewhat keen eye for things when it comes to how things are changing online. I’m not saying I necessarily follow through and implement a lot of this (because of my desire to master the fundamentals), but let’s just say that when things start shifting it doesn’t necessarily come as a huge surprise to me.

As much as I said I see a maturing happening in Internet Marketing, there’s always going to be some level of hype and promise of riches. Some marketers may alter how they do their marketing (example: instead of long, hyped up sales pages they’ve learned to do more storytelling through video), but the hype is still there.

There will also always be the ‘victims’.

People who blame marketers for promises they supposedly don’t deliver after they’ve made the decision to spend their last dollar on someone’s product or service.

The responsibility is on YOU. Don’t look to anyone to be the magic bullet or answer to your business challenges.

Content Still Reigns Supreme

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again unless you have very deep pockets for advertising, you need to create content. The more consistent you are with your content the better it will get.

The type of content you create however is changing a bit. As much as Google loves their listicle posts, you can’t just throw up the same regurgitated post of the Top 10 this or that. Don’t get me wrong, I love the listicle posts as much as anyone, but do we really need another Top SEO plugins list for WordPress? Unless you can come up with a different way to present this content and do it better than someone else, is it really worth it?

I’m working on a post about needing more storytelling in the WordPress space.

The regurgitation of the same types of posts is getting old.

There are SO many different types of content you can create, step outside of the box and try something different. Ask your audience what they want from you, what are their struggles, frustrations, and challenges. Use that as content instead of simply looking at what competitors are doing.

The first type of content that I’m going to be investing more time into is video.

I’ve always done screencast videos, but live video has huge potential. I don’t know if I shared this on the podcast or not, but the day after I did my first Livestream on Facebook I posted the video as a blog post and wrote a shorter post on my thoughts of my first Livestream. That post was my highest traffic day in months.

I think with live video becoming more mainstream by the end of the year the people who don’t have a strategy for this (and I’m referring only to people who are using it for business, not the hobbyist or people simply sharing their life with their audience) won’t have much traction. Just like any other type of content the quality will have to be there. I’m not necessarily referring to the quality of the video (although you want to do the best you can with what you have, right?), I’m referring to the quality of the content in the video.

The Bots Are Coming

You’d have to be offline for a while to not notice all the noise about AI and bots lately.

The future is here.

At first I didn’t see how I would be able to use bots in my business (read: I hadn’t done enough reading or learning to really grasp what could be done) until recently. I’ve got a test I’m going to do next week in conjunction with a Facebook live and messenger (if you haven’t noticed, Facebook is putting some serious energy into messenger). I’m going to test a tool called ManyChat that allows you to create a campaign through messenger (I go into more detail in the podcast on this). I want to test how effective the follow-up sequence is in using this platform to drive traffic to a landing page. I’m doing this for LeadSurveys, so if you’re interested in following along (or attending live), be sure to like our LeadSurveys Facebook page.

There are so many other ways to use bots in your business, but you know me… my recommendation is to make sure you have the fundamentals working in your business before jumping into something new. If you’re not building your email list through your website, don’t have any follow-up sequences in place and are not communicating regularly with your audience, don’t jump into bots.

There’s a fine line between communicating and spam. A friend of mine tested this as a viewer of someone else’s FB live and she literally got 8 messages via Facebook messenger in 24 hours.

Too much.

Dare to Be Different

At the risk of ending this episode like Stuart Smalley (Saturday Night Live, “I’m smart enough, I’m good enough, and gosh darn it people like me!”), the BEST thing you can do is be yourself. Modeling how people do things is fine, but if you’re stuck and think the way out is to do what someone else has done because they’ve been successful, it’s not going to work.

The coaching space is a perfect example of this.

So many people who get into coaching look like carbon copies of their mentor or coach. The package looks good (the website, the branding, the colors, the photos of them on stage at an event with their headset mic), but when you go a little deeper into their site you can’t really grasp what it is they do, or worse yet, why you should hire them.

Don’t be afraid to have an opinion, speak your mind, or take a stance.

Links from this episode

The Obstacle is The Way

Ego is The Enemy

ManyChat

SEO for Growth

Phil Singleton

LeadSurveys Facebook Page (Like us!)

 

]]>
This episode is sponsored by LiquidWeb... Managed WordPress Hosting Done Right (my words). One of my favorite non-fiction books of all time is 'The Obstacle is The Way" by Ryan Holiday. Last year he released "Ego is the Enemy",

This episode is sponsored by LiquidWeb... Managed WordPress Hosting Done Right (my words).


One of my favorite non-fiction books of all time is 'The Obstacle is The Way" by Ryan Holiday. Last year he released "Ego is the Enemy", which comes as a close second.

What do I love so much about these books?

The stories.

True stories.

Of people who have come before us, faced adversity, lived by their convictions, and stood for something. Having been born in San Francisco (a 5th generation) and raised a 49er fan, it didn't come as much of a surprise when Ryan referenced the late, great Bill Walsh.

I'm not about to start spewing NFL statistics, but I don't think there are many people that would argue if I said Bill Walsh was one of the game's greatest coaches. Of all time.

Here's why Ryan Holiday was so influenced by Bill Walsh's book, The Score Takes Care of Itself.

"Walsh took the 49ers from the worst team in football to the Super Bowl in less than 3 years. How? Not with a grand vision or pure ambition, but with what he called the Standard of Performance. That is: How to practice. How to dress. How to hold the ball. Where to be on a play down the very inch. Which skills mattered for each position. How much effort to give. By upholding these standards—whatever they happen to be for your chosen craft—success will take care of itself."
-Ryan Holiday (from his post, Books to Base Your Life On)

What do these books have to do with online marketing?

Everything.



When you hear the term 'internet marketing' does your mind automatically go to images of young guys posing in front of Ferrari's, mansions, yachts, and all their friends living the 'laptop lifestyle'?

Yea.

Me too.

Before I come off like a complete hypocrite, I will say that I bought into the 'laptop lifestyle' for a bit. When I was part of the mastermind for a couple years I thought that meant you were successful. It was almost as though if you were showing your fabulous lifestyle then you weren't successful.

No one told me I needed to buy into this, I went willingly.

Why?

Because I didn't trust myself. I didn't trust that how I wanted to live my life, what type of business I wanted and getting there on my own terms was enough.

I had some success, but it wasn't sustainable.



I was spending a lot of money in hopes of making a lot of money.

It was exhausting.

I had some amazing experiences, met some wonderful people and learned a lot. It was because of the mastermind that I started paid traffic (Facebook ads). I also learned how I didn't want to run my business.

]]>
Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 59:02
Profitable Projects – My Interview with Brent Weaver of Ugurus WPCP: 144 https://thewpchick.com/profitable-projects-my-interview-with-brent-weaver-of-ugurus-wpcp-144/ Fri, 21 Apr 2017 23:51:46 +0000 https://thewpchick.com/?p=20063 This episode is sponsored by my awesome web host, LiquidWeb I think at some point many web developers are posed with the question of growing their business into an agency or staying on the solo path (even if you have a team, you may choose to stay small). I waffled with this for a long time. You guys have heard me say over and over again that it had never been my intention to build websites. I fell in love with WordPress, started playing around with it and the next thing I knew I was bartering a website in exchange to having some tile done in my house. At the time, it was a win-win. Looking back sometimes I wonder if it was choosing the wrong fork in the road, but I guess that's how we learn, right? Fast forward to a few years after that first project and I had hired a developer and a designer. The only problem with doing this was that I never really learned to properly price my projects. A couple years after having hired the developer and designer I had a project manager and an outsourcing company (other WordPress site builders, like myself, were using my developers and designers). At the time it seemed like a smart decision. It was great cash flow and didn't require much on my end. It did, however, give me a much higher overhead than I ever wanted and all of the sudden I felt trapped. The good news is if you really love what you're doing and have a passion for building websites, you can learn how to scale your business into an agency with larger projects that are much more profitable than the freelancing only route. That's what Brent Weaver of Ugurus learned. Brent got into website building at a young age, continued doing so with a good friend (still his business partner), learned a lot of the mistakes we all make along the way, then figured out how to scale his business the right way. Questions I Asked Brent Before we get into Ugurus, what were you doing before you launched the company? What brought you to creating Ugurus? (Why did you start the company?) When you launched Ugurus, was the Bootcamp your first product? What are some of the things that get in the way of people creating an agency (moving from freelancer or solo entrepreneur to agency owner) When I was looking at the 10 weeks of the bootcamp, one of the things that stood out to me was in week 4, the anatomy of the $10k project: Discover why you need to transition how you present yourself. I noticed a huge difference once I scaled my team and it wasn't just me. Any tips you can share without giving away your course? Are there common characteristics you find that make someone a good agency owner (vs. staying a freelancer)? When should someone consider expanding their team? When's the next Bootcamp? What You're Going to Learn What Brent was doing in Australia for 6 months and how he realized cubicle life wasn't for him How he and his partner almost ran their business into the ground When it's good to have office space (what are the 'right reasons') How investing in mentoring and coaches shifted the business (and created a business they could sell after 12 years) When Brent realized there was something to the teaching and training he was doing (hint: he was creating content) What the first Ugurus course was How they've built their team of coaches What courses Ugurus offers Like Brent mentioned in the episode, you can get access to their Web Design Sales kit! Just click the button below to get free access! Where to Connect with Brent Website | Twitter | Facebook   profitable-projects

This episode is sponsored by my awesome web host, LiquidWeb

LiquidWeb-Managed-WordPress-Hosting

I think at some point many web developers are posed with the question of growing their business into an agency or staying on the solo path (even if you have a team, you may choose to stay small).

I waffled with this for a long time. You guys have heard me say over and over again that it had never been my intention to build websites. I fell in love with WordPress, started playing around with it and the next thing I knew I was bartering a website in exchange to having some tile done in my house. At the time, it was a win-win. Looking back sometimes I wonder if it was choosing the wrong fork in the road, but I guess that’s how we learn, right?

Fast forward to a few years after that first project and I had hired a developer and a designer. The only problem with doing this was that I never really learned to properly price my projects.

A couple years after having hired the developer and designer I had a project manager and an outsourcing company (other WordPress site builders, like myself, were using my developers and designers). At the time it seemed like a smart decision. It was great cash flow and didn’t require much on my end. It did, however, give me a much higher overhead than I ever wanted and all of the sudden I felt trapped.

The good news is if you really love what you’re doing and have a passion for building websites, you can learn how to scale your business into an agency with larger projects that are much more profitable than the freelancing only route.

That’s what Brent Weaver of Ugurus learned.Brent Weaver

Brent got into website building at a young age, continued doing so with a good friend (still his business partner), learned a lot of the mistakes we all make along the way, then figured out how to scale his business the right way.

Questions I Asked Brent

  1. Before we get into Ugurus, what were you doing before you launched the company?
  2. What brought you to creating Ugurus? (Why did you start the company?)
  3. When you launched Ugurus, was the Bootcamp your first product?
  4. What are some of the things that get in the way of people creating an agency (moving from freelancer or solo entrepreneur to agency owner)
  5. When I was looking at the 10 weeks of the bootcamp, one of the things that stood out to me was in week 4, the anatomy of the $10k project: Discover why you need to transition how you present yourself. I noticed a huge difference once I scaled my team and it wasn’t just me. Any tips you can share without giving away your course?
  6. Are there common characteristics you find that make someone a good agency owner (vs. staying a freelancer)?
  7. When should someone consider expanding their team?
  8. When’s the next Bootcamp?

What You’re Going to Learn

  • What Brent was doing in Australia for 6 months and how he realized cubicle life wasn’t for him
  • How he and his partner almost ran their business into the ground
  • When it’s good to have office space (what are the ‘right reasons’)
  • How investing in mentoring and coaches shifted the business (and created a business they could sell after 12 years)
  • When Brent realized there was something to the teaching and training he was doing (hint: he was creating content)
  • What the first Ugurus course was
  • How they’ve built their team of coaches
  • What courses Ugurus offers

Like Brent mentioned in the episode, you can get access to their Web Design Sales kit! Just click the button below to get free access!

Where to Connect with Brent

Website | Twitter | Facebook

 

]]>
This episode is sponsored by my awesome web host, LiquidWeb I think at some point many web developers are posed with the question of growing their business into an agency or staying on the solo path (even if you have a team, This episode is sponsored by my awesome web host, LiquidWeb


I think at some point many web developers are posed with the question of growing their business into an agency or staying on the solo path (even if you have a team, you may choose to stay small).
I waffled with this for a long time. You guys have heard me say over and over again that it had never been my intention to build websites. I fell in love with WordPress, started playing around with it and the next thing I knew I was bartering a website in exchange to having some tile done in my house. At the time, it was a win-win. Looking back sometimes I wonder if it was choosing the wrong fork in the road, but I guess that's how we learn, right?
Fast forward to a few years after that first project and I had hired a developer and a designer. The only problem with doing this was that I never really learned to properly price my projects.
A couple years after having hired the developer and designer I had a project manager and an outsourcing company (other WordPress site builders, like myself, were using my developers and designers). At the time it seemed like a smart decision. It was great cash flow and didn't require much on my end. It did, however, give me a much higher overhead than I ever wanted and all of the sudden I felt trapped.
The good news is if you really love what you're doing and have a passion for building websites, you can learn how to scale your business into an agency with larger projects that are much more profitable than the freelancing only route.
That's what Brent Weaver of Ugurus learned.
Brent got into website building at a young age, continued doing so with a good friend (still his business partner), learned a lot of the mistakes we all make along the way, then figured out how to scale his business the right way.
Questions I Asked Brent


Before we get into Ugurus, what were you doing before you launched the company?
What brought you to creating Ugurus? (Why did you start the company?)
When you launched Ugurus, was the Bootcamp your first product?
What are some of the things that get in the way of people creating an agency (moving from freelancer or solo entrepreneur to agency owner)
When I was looking at the 10 weeks of the bootcamp, one of the things that stood out to me was in week 4, the anatomy of the $10k project: Discover why you need to transition how you present yourself. I noticed a huge difference once I scaled my team and it wasn't just me. Any tips you can share without giving away your course?
Are there common characteristics you find that make someone a good agency owner (vs. staying a freelancer)?
When should someone consider expanding their team?
When's the next Bootcamp?



What You're Going to Learn

* What Brent was doing in Australia for 6 months and how he realized cubicle life wasn't for him
* How he and his partner almost ran their business into the ground
* When it's good to have office space (what are the 'right reasons')
* How investing in mentoring and coaches shifted the business (and created a business they could sell after 12 years)
* When Brent realized there was something to the teaching and training he was doing (hint: he was creating content)
* What the first Ugurus course was
* How they've built their team of coaches
* What courses Ugurus offers


Like Brent mentioned in the episode, you can get access to their Web Design Sales kit! Just click the button below to get free access!


Where to Connect with Brent
]]>
Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 51:34
PowerPack for Beaver Builder – Behind the Scenes with Puneet Sahalot WPCP: 143 https://thewpchick.com/powerpack-for-beaver-builder-behind-the-scenes-with-puneet-sahalot-wpcp-143/ Fri, 14 Apr 2017 23:27:13 +0000 https://thewpchick.com/?p=20034 This episode is sponsored by my awesome web host, LiquidWeb It's no doubt that I'm a huge fan of Beaver Builder page builder for WordPress. Because of how awesome Beaver Builder is, there are a lot of great 3rd party products being developed. One of my favorite products is PowerPack by WPBeaverAddons. PowerPack takes Beaver Builder to a whole new level with a massive collection of additional modules and templates. Needless to say, PowerPack is a staple now for me with any site I'm working on (which is pretty much only my own projects at this point, but it's definitely a staple). I had connected with the founder of PowerPack, Puneet Sahalot, through the amazing Beaver Builder community a while ago and knew I wanted to have him on the show. I was excited to talk to Puneet because they came on the scene pretty quickly and have made a huge mark in the Beaver Builder community. I'm constantly amazed at what they give to the community (they also have their own free Facebook group) as well as offering great tutorials and content on their blog. Questions I Asked Puneet Before we get into all the awesomeness that is PowerPack, tell us about IdeaBox and the history behind your company. How did you get into Beaver Builder? What made you decide to go all in with the Beaver Builder add-on modules? The Beaver Builder community is certainly an amazing community online. You guys have really embraced the community and become a part of that. How has the journey with PowerPack been? How do you and your team decide which modules to start with and how do you decide which features to add? How are you guys marketing PowerPack? What's coming this year for you and your team? What You're Going to Learn How they launched PowerPack in a short period of time and gained massive traction How they came up with their pricing model What other plugins Puneet and his team have created How they're using free plugins to build their audience Which form builders they created custom modules for first How their Facebook group drives which features and modules they work on first How many modules they launched PowerPack with Where to Connect with Puneet Website | Facebook Group | Twitter PowerPack

This episode is sponsored by my awesome web host, LiquidWeb

LiquidWeb-Managed-WordPress-Hosting

It’s no doubt that I’m a huge fan of Beaver Builder page builder for WordPress. Because of how awesome Beaver Builder is, there are a lot of great 3rd party products being developed. One of my favorite products is PowerPack by WPBeaverAddons.

PowerPack takes Beaver Builder to a whole new level with a massive collection of additional modules and templates.

Needless to say, PowerPack is a staple now for me with any site I’m working on (which is pretty much only my own projects at this point, but it’s definitely a staple).Puneet Sahalot

I had connected with the founder of PowerPack, Puneet Sahalot, through the amazing Beaver Builder community a while ago and knew I wanted to have him on the show. I was excited to talk to Puneet because they came on the scene pretty quickly and have made a huge mark in the Beaver Builder community. I’m constantly amazed at what they give to the community (they also have their own free Facebook group) as well as offering great tutorials and content on their blog.

Questions I Asked Puneet

  1. Before we get into all the awesomeness that is PowerPack, tell us about IdeaBox and the history behind your company.
  2. How did you get into Beaver Builder?
  3. What made you decide to go all in with the Beaver Builder add-on modules?
  4. The Beaver Builder community is certainly an amazing community online. You guys have really embraced the community and become a part of that. How has the journey with PowerPack been?
  5. How do you and your team decide which modules to start with and how do you decide which features to add?
  6. How are you guys marketing PowerPack?
  7. What’s coming this year for you and your team?

What You’re Going to Learn

  • How they launched PowerPack in a short period of time and gained massive traction
  • How they came up with their pricing model
  • What other plugins Puneet and his team have created
  • How they’re using free plugins to build their audience
  • Which form builders they created custom modules for first
  • How their Facebook group drives which features and modules they work on first
  • How many modules they launched PowerPack with

Where to Connect with Puneet

Website | Facebook Group | Twitter

]]>
This episode is sponsored by my awesome web host, LiquidWeb It's no doubt that I'm a huge fan of Beaver Builder page builder for WordPress. Because of how awesome Beaver Builder is, there are a lot of great 3rd party products being developed.
This episode is sponsored by my awesome web host, LiquidWeb




It's no doubt that I'm a huge fan of Beaver Builder page builder for WordPress. Because of how awesome Beaver Builder is, there are a lot of great 3rd party products being developed. One of my favorite products is PowerPack by WPBeaverAddons.

PowerPack takes Beaver Builder to a whole new level with a massive collection of additional modules and templates.

Needless to say, PowerPack is a staple now for me with any site I'm working on (which is pretty much only my own projects at this point, but it's definitely a staple).

I had connected with the founder of PowerPack, Puneet Sahalot, through the amazing Beaver Builder community a while ago and knew I wanted to have him on the show. I was excited to talk to Puneet because they came on the scene pretty quickly and have made a huge mark in the Beaver Builder community. I'm constantly amazed at what they give to the community (they also have their own free Facebook group) as well as offering great tutorials and content on their blog.

Questions I Asked Puneet

* Before we get into all the awesomeness that is PowerPack, tell us about IdeaBox and the history behind your company.
* How did you get into Beaver Builder?
* What made you decide to go all in with the Beaver Builder add-on modules?
* The Beaver Builder community is certainly an amazing community online. You guys have really embraced the community and become a part of that. How has the journey with PowerPack been?
* How do you and your team decide which modules to start with and how do you decide which features to add?
* How are you guys marketing PowerPack?
* What's coming this year for you and your team?

What You're Going to Learn

* How they launched PowerPack in a short period of time and gained massive traction
* How they came up with their pricing model
* What other plugins Puneet and his team have created
* How they're using free plugins to build their audience
* Which form builders they created custom modules for first
* How their Facebook group drives which features and modules they work on first
* How many modules they launched PowerPack with


Where to Connect with Puneet
Website | Facebook Group | Twitter]]>
Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 33:21
Lead Generation and List Building: My Latest Obsession WPCP: 142 https://thewpchick.com/lead-generation-and-list-building-my-latest-obsession-wpcp-142/ Fri, 07 Apr 2017 14:30:11 +0000 https://thewpchick.com/?p=19910 Thanks to my podcast sponsor, Liquid Web, for sponsoring The WPChick Podcast!   I know that lead generation and list building are nothing new but hang in there with me. We're going to go in a little different direction with this and a lot of it might be new to you (or you might be aware of it but haven't implemented it... yet). My goal with this episode is to get you to look at lead generation and list building from a different perspective, not just something that internet marketers push because "the money is in the list"... because let's face it, in this case, quantity doesn't count as much as quality. I was recently reading a post by Matthew Woodward where he deleted over 40k subscribers from his mailing list. FORTY THOUSAND! (if you want to read the full post, click through to Matthew's blog here) First of all, kudos to him for doing that. My last purge was over 1000 people, and that was painful. I can't imagine deleting 42k subscribers. However, he just saved himself a ton of money by getting rid of people who were not responsive. Anyone who hasn't opened your email in the past 6 months probably needs to go. Plain and simple. Let's start with the missing piece of the puzzle to all of this. There is a correct way to build a list and an incorrect way to build a list. The problem is that you don't know it's incorrect until after the fact (at least I didn't). And let me say that doing something is always going to be better than doing nothing. I will confess that I haven't ever purchased a list building course (at least not to my recollection... 9 years in it's quite possible there is something sitting on a hard drive somewhere that promised me wealth through list building). Not because there weren't plenty of opportunities, but quite frankly, none of them seemed all that appealing to me. Most seemed to focus on the basics: I know that's probably over-simplifying it a bit, but you get the picture. I'm sure there are courses or people out there who get much deeper into this stuff, but for the most part, it seems like so much of this stuff is assumed. Marketers assume you know how to do this or are already doing it. Take ClickFunnels as an example. As a ClickFunnels customer, you can share funnels and import other people's funnels. All great. But if you don't have the foundation set up to manage your new subscribers it's a lot of energy for nothing. Because the magic starts happening in the background with automation. Some of the things that have to be set up in the background are things like: Correct lists and segmentation Tagging framework (if your autoresponder company uses this) Tracking code on your website Follow up sequence UTM links for tracking (any links in your follow up sequence) Offer at the end And none of this includes how you choose to communicate and email your subscribers once they've gone through whatever initial email sequence they signed up for. Where I Started Aweber was one of the first email marketing companies I used and it was great for what I was doing at the time. Aweber didn't have tagging options when I was with them (as of this writing they still don't have options for tagging. There is the ability to create segments but I don't know enough about that to talk about it here). For a long time, I stuck with simply using lists to segment even after I left Aweber. Once I moved to another platform (probably one of my first times with Infusionsoft), I started tagging people as well (even though I wasn't doing much with the tags). My first task was to go into Active Campaign and clean up my lists and then tags. Like I do with everything else, I started with the end in mind. I mapped out the monetization model for WPChick. From there, I had to take a look at my lists (and any corresponding follow-up sequences) and see if they made sense. Lead generation and list building
Thanks to my podcast sponsor, Liquid Web, for sponsoring The WPChick Podcast!

LiquidWeb Managed WordPress Hosting

 

I know that lead generation and list building are nothing new but hang in there with me.

We’re going to go in a little different direction with this and a lot of it might be new to you (or you might be aware of it but haven’t implemented it… yet).

My goal with this episode is to get you to look at lead generation and list building from a different perspective, not just something that internet marketers push because “the money is in the list”… because let’s face it, in this case, quantity doesn’t count as much as quality. I was recently reading a post by Matthew Woodward where he deleted over 40k subscribers from his mailing list.

FORTY THOUSAND!

matthew-woodward

(if you want to read the full post, click through to Matthew’s blog here)

First of all, kudos to him for doing that.

My last purge was over 1000 people, and that was painful. I can’t imagine deleting 42k subscribers.

However, he just saved himself a ton of money by getting rid of people who were not responsive. Anyone who hasn’t opened your email in the past 6 months probably needs to go. Plain and simple.

Let’s start with the missing piece of the puzzle to all of this.

There is a correct way to build a list and an incorrect way to build a list. The problem is that you don’t know it’s incorrect until after the fact (at least I didn’t).

And let me say that doing something is always going to be better than doing nothing.

I will confess that I haven’t ever purchased a list building course (at least not to my recollection… 9 years in it’s quite possible there is something sitting on a hard drive somewhere that promised me wealth through list building).

Not because there weren’t plenty of opportunities, but quite frankly, none of them seemed all that appealing to me.

Most seemed to focus on the basics:

I know that’s probably over-simplifying it a bit, but you get the picture.

I’m sure there are courses or people out there who get much deeper into this stuff, but for the most part, it seems like so much of this stuff is assumed.

Marketers assume you know how to do this or are already doing it.

Take ClickFunnels as an example.

As a ClickFunnels customer, you can share funnels and import other people’s funnels.

All great.

But if you don’t have the foundation set up to manage your new subscribers it’s a lot of energy for nothing.

Because the magic starts happening in the background with automation.

Some of the things that have to be set up in the background are things like:

  • Correct lists and segmentation
  • Tagging framework (if your autoresponder company uses this)
  • Tracking code on your website
  • Follow up sequence
  • UTM links for tracking (any links in your follow up sequence)
  • Offer at the end

And none of this includes how you choose to communicate and email your subscribers once they’ve gone through whatever initial email sequence they signed up for.

Where I Started

Aweber was one of the first email marketing companies I used and it was great for what I was doing at the time. Aweber didn’t have tagging options when I was with them (as of this writing they still don’t have options for tagging. There is the ability to create segments but I don’t know enough about that to talk about it here). For a long time, I stuck with simply using lists to segment even after I left Aweber.

Once I moved to another platform (probably one of my first times with Infusionsoft), I started tagging people as well (even though I wasn’t doing much with the tags).

My first task was to go into Active Campaign and clean up my lists and then tags.

Like I do with everything else, I started with the end in mind. I mapped out the monetization model for WPChick.

WPChick Map

From there, I had to take a look at my lists (and any corresponding follow-up sequences) and see if they made sense.

I had lists (and tags) that didn’t fit into the model that I had mapped out. I had to decide if there was something that made sense to move them to OR delete the list entirely (fortunately I didn’t have anything that was too out of sync with what I had created).

The next step was to then go in and clean up my tags and create a tagging framework. A friend shared Anne Headen’s Active Campaign tagging framework which made a ton of sense to me and was easy to implement. I adjusted the framework from her suggestion so it fit my business model and have stuck with it since I implemented it ( a few weeks ago).

What I’m finding now though is that there are tags ‘out there’ that still need updating (I’ve gone through all my Thrive Leads forms but apparently I’ve missed a few because as people opt-in the old tags are showing up in my account again, so I have to go in and clean them all up again. Active Campaign makes this pretty easy by allowing you to delete a tag and move those subscribers to another tag).

Next Step

The next step was to map out my lead magnets that would support the monetization map. Just to reiterate those methods:

  1. Mini Courses
  2. Content Strategy Signature Course
  3. One-off Coaching Sessions
  4. Affiliate Marketing
  5. Podcast Sponsorship

I have a handful of lead magnets already (one I just updated) but didn’t have a sequence (funnel) in place with a solid strategy.

I shared this in a recent post, but here are two of the lead magnet funnels mapped out:

Lead gen map

The sequence I created for the first lead magnet on the left is a simple follow up sequence that leads to an offer at the end.

Follow up sequences are great for engagement but if you don’t an offer in there somewhere you’re shooting yourself in the foot (something I’ve done on plenty of occasions).

As of the writing of this post,  I have the first lead magnet sequence completed set up and running. I need to write the emails for the second sequence (and may do more than 4 emails and change the time intervals between emails) but should have that done within the next week.

Some of this might look like a lot of work, but I can tell you it was SO worth it.

I now have to do this for each lead magnet I’ve created and make sure that my content upgrades throughout the site are updated with the relevant follow up sequences as well.

Tracking, Measuring, and Testing

So important, but not my favorite topic.

I’ve always done the basics with tracking, measuring, and testing, but have finally jumped full force into doing this correctly and with some structure.

There’s way too much to cover in one podcast episode, but here are some simple things you can do to begin.

First, make sure you have Google Analytics installed and everything is working in Google Search Console (used to be Google Webmaster tools). Make sure your site is being indexed and tracked correctly from Big G.

The next step is to ensure you’re creating UTM tracking codes for all the links you’re creating in your email campaigns. I did a recent post and video on how to do this (it’s much simpler than you think) on LeadSurveys. You can check out ‘How to Create UTM tracking codes’ here.

Lastly, create a tracking method that works for YOU.

I’ve finally fallen in love with Google Docs, sheets, drive… the whole kit and kaboodle. I’m using Google Sheets for everything (still in the process of setting things up) and am going to see what I zaps I can create (via Zapier), to automate as much tracking as possible.

Testing opt-in methods, placement, and tools

This is one of those areas that I tend to ‘insert foot in mouth’ often.

More confession time… sometimes I don’t give things the due diligence or attention they need to actually ‘work’.

All of that is changing.

Even though I have my ‘staple’ of things that I use (Thrive Leads and Thrive Content Builder), I love testing and playing with new things. I also think it’s vitally important to try new things because they may convert better.

My latest test?

ConvertFlow

I’m still using Thrive Leads (and will continue to), but there are display rules with Thrive Leads that are a little ‘limiting’ (for lack of a better word).

CovertFlow has campaigns and flows. I had tried ConvertFlow last fall, but wasn’t happy with the lack of documentation or how the dashboard was set up. Things have changed since then (I canceled). My guess is they have had an infusion of cash and probably someone helping them with the things that were lacking (good onboarding was severely lacking and the only documentation at the time was 4 blog posts. Now they have videos each step of the way).

While I’m very impressed with the changes that ConvertFlow has made I’m not sure where I stand with staying with it.

I’ve got a little time left on my trial, so we’ll see.

The key is going to be getting a good flow set up and having enough people go through that (which means I need to finish that up).

I’ll keep you posted on the testing.

Links Mentioned in this episode

Thrive Leads

Active Campaign

Google UTM Campaign Builder

ConvertFlow

My Lead Magnet Sequence Map

]]>
Thanks to my podcast sponsor, Liquid Web, for sponsoring The WPChick Podcast! -   I know that lead generation and list building are nothing new but hang in there with me. We're going to go in a little different direction with this and a lot of i... Thanks to my podcast sponsor, Liquid Web, for sponsoring The WPChick Podcast!

 


I know that lead generation and list building are nothing new but hang in there with me.
We're going to go in a little different direction with this and a lot of it might be new to you (or you might be aware of it but haven't implemented it... yet).

My goal with this episode is to get you to look at lead generation and list building from a different perspective, not just something that internet marketers push because "the money is in the list"... because let's face it, in this case, quantity doesn't count as much as quality. I was recently reading a post by Matthew Woodward where he deleted over 40k subscribers from his mailing list.

FORTY THOUSAND!



(if you want to read the full post, click through to Matthew's blog here)

First of all, kudos to him for doing that.

My last purge was over 1000 people, and that was painful. I can't imagine deleting 42k subscribers.

However, he just saved himself a ton of money by getting rid of people who were not responsive. Anyone who hasn't opened your email in the past 6 months probably needs to go. Plain and simple.

Let's start with the missing piece of the puzzle to all of this.

There is a correct way to build a list and an incorrect way to build a list. The problem is that you don't know it's incorrect until after the fact (at least I didn't).

And let me say that doing something is always going to be better than doing nothing.

I will confess that I haven't ever purchased a list building course (at least not to my recollection... 9 years in it's quite possible there is something sitting on a hard drive somewhere that promised me wealth through list building).

Not because there weren't plenty of opportunities, but quite frankly, none of them seemed all that appealing to me.

Most seemed to focus on the basics:



I know that's probably over-simplifying it a bit, but you get the picture.

I'm sure there are courses or people out there who get much deeper into this stuff, but for the most part, it seems like so much of this stuff is assumed.

Marketers assume you know how to do this or are already doing it.

Take ClickFunnels as an example.

As a ClickFunnels customer, you can share funnels and import other people's funnels.

All great.

But if you don't have the foundation set up to manage your new subscribers it's a lot of energy for nothing.

Because the magic starts happening in the background with automation.

Some of the things that have to be set up in the background are things like:

* Correct lists and segmentation
* Tagging framework (if your autoresponder company uses this)
* Tracking code on your website
* Follow up sequence
* UTM links for tracking (any links in your follow up sequence)
* Offer at the end

And none of this includes how you choose to communicate and email your subscribers once they've gone through whatever initial email sequence they signed up for.

Where I Started

Aweber was one of the first email marketing companies I used and it was great for what I was doing at the time. Aweber didn't have tagging options when I was with them (as of this writing they s...]]>
Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 53:36
Content Planning & Creating, with Lance Jones of Airstory WPCP: 141 https://thewpchick.com/content-planning-creating-with-lance-jones-of-airstory-wpcp-141/ Fri, 31 Mar 2017 17:40:11 +0000 https://thewpchick.com/?p=19852 This episode is sponsored by LiquidWeb, my awesome Managed WordPress host Anytime I hear about anything that will help me with my content creation and planning I get excited. Plus, you know me and how much I love new tools. I do have a confession to make, though, I haven't spent as much time as I want to in Airstory. As I've been streamlining things in my business I've started spending more time 'cleaning' things up. So right now everything is a process. It doesn't make a ton of sense to jump into new things before I've made space for them. My initial interest in Airstory was because of needing to create a content strategy for LeadSurveys (still working on that one). I came across Airstory through Producthunt and as soon as I saw who was behind the app (Joanna Wiebe & Lance Jones of Copyhackers), I knew it was something I wanted to try. Who would be better at putting together an app for organizing content and writing than a writer? I'll definitely do a follow-up post with how I'm using Airstory and what is working for me (truth: this might take a little longer since I'm approaching my content from a different perspective. In other words, taking more time to create more in-depth content. I'll still produce some quick posts when the mood strikes me, but I want to go deeper most of the time). Let's jump into the interview Questions I Asked Lance Before we get into Airstory, your partner in business and life is Joanna Wiebe and you two are the brains behind Copyhackers. For those who aren't familiar with Copyhackers, can you share what the site is about and what you guys do? Let's jump into Airstory. Can you explain what Airstory is? What made you guys decided to create a SaaS product? Can you share what the process was like for building Airstory? You guys did a beta run of the app before it launched to the public on February 2nd. How did you determine the length of the beta? Let's talk pricing. Something that seems to be a little all over the place with SaaS products. How did you decide on the pricing model for Airstory? What's the plan for the remainder of this year? What You're Going to Learn How they went about starting a web app (and why they didn't go with a WordPress plugin) How long it took to go from idea to beta release (and how changing developers was the right move) What type of feedback their users have been giving What features people use most in Airstory How Airstory is being compared to Google Docs The roll that cards and drag and drop functionality play in Airstory What integrations and extensions make Airstory so easy to use Where to Connect with Lance, Joanna and Airstory Airstory | Facebook | Twitter Airstory

This episode is sponsored by LiquidWeb, my awesome Managed WordPress host

LiquidWeb-Managed-WordPress-Hosting

Anytime I hear about anything that will help me with my content creation and planning I get excited.

Plus, you know me and how much I love new tools.

I do have a confession to make, though, I haven’t spent as much time as I want to in Airstory. As I’ve been streamlining things in my business I’ve started spending more time ‘cleaning’ things up. So right now everything is a process. It doesn’t make a ton of sense to jump into new things before I’ve made space for them.

My initial interest in Airstory was because of needing to create a content strategy for LeadSurveys (still working on that one). I came across Airstory through Producthunt and as soon as I saw who was behind the app (Joanna Wiebe & Lance Jones of Copyhackers), I knew it was something I wanted to try.

Who would be better at putting together an app for organizing content and writing than a writer?

I’ll definitely do a follow-up post with how I’m using Airstory and what is working for me (truth: this might take a little longer since I’m approaching my content from a different perspective. In other words, taking more time to create more in-depth content. I’ll still produce some quick posts when the mood strikes me, but I want to go deeper most of the time).

Let’s jump into the interview

Questions I Asked Lance

  1. Before we get into Airstory, your partner in business and life is Joanna Wiebe and you two are the brains behind Copyhackers. For those who aren’t familiar with Copyhackers, can you share what the site is about and what you guys do?
  2. Let’s jump into Airstory. Can you explain what Airstory is?
  3. What made you guys decided to create a SaaS product?
  4. Can you share what the process was like for building Airstory?
  5. You guys did a beta run of the app before it launched to the public on February 2nd. How did you determine the length of the beta?
  6. Let’s talk pricing. Something that seems to be a little all over the place with SaaS products. How did you decide on the pricing model for Airstory?
  7. What’s the plan for the remainder of this year?

What You’re Going to Learn

  • How they went about starting a web app (and why they didn’t go with a WordPress plugin)
  • How long it took to go from idea to beta release (and how changing developers was the right move)
  • What type of feedback their users have been giving
  • What features people use most in Airstory
  • How Airstory is being compared to Google Docs
  • The roll that cards and drag and drop functionality play in Airstory
  • What integrations and extensions make Airstory so easy to use

Where to Connect with Lance, Joanna and Airstory

Airstory | Facebook | Twitter

]]>
This episode is sponsored by LiquidWeb, my awesome Managed WordPress host - Anytime I hear about anything that will help me with my content creation and planning I get excited. - Plus, you know me and how much I love new tools. - This episode is sponsored by LiquidWeb, my awesome Managed WordPress host



Anytime I hear about anything that will help me with my content creation and planning I get excited.

Plus, you know me and how much I love new tools.

I do have a confession to make, though, I haven't spent as much time as I want to in Airstory. As I've been streamlining things in my business I've started spending more time 'cleaning' things up. So right now everything is a process. It doesn't make a ton of sense to jump into new things before I've made space for them.

My initial interest in Airstory was because of needing to create a content strategy for LeadSurveys (still working on that one). I came across Airstory through Producthunt and as soon as I saw who was behind the app (Joanna Wiebe & Lance Jones of Copyhackers), I knew it was something I wanted to try.

Who would be better at putting together an app for organizing content and writing than a writer?

I'll definitely do a follow-up post with how I'm using Airstory and what is working for me (truth: this might take a little longer since I'm approaching my content from a different perspective. In other words, taking more time to create more in-depth content. I'll still produce some quick posts when the mood strikes me, but I want to go deeper most of the time).





Let's jump into the interview
Questions I Asked Lance

* Before we get into Airstory, your partner in business and life is Joanna Wiebe and you two are the brains behind Copyhackers. For those who aren't familiar with Copyhackers, can you share what the site is about and what you guys do?
* Let's jump into Airstory. Can you explain what Airstory is?
* What made you guys decided to create a SaaS product?
* Can you share what the process was like for building Airstory?
* You guys did a beta run of the app before it launched to the public on February 2nd. How did you determine the length of the beta?
* Let's talk pricing. Something that seems to be a little all over the place with SaaS products. How did you decide on the pricing model for Airstory?
* What's the plan for the remainder of this year?




What You're Going to Learn

* How they went about starting a web app (and why they didn't go with a WordPress plugin)
* How long it took to go from idea to beta release (and how changing developers was the right move)
* What type of feedback their users have been giving
* What features people use most in Airstory
* How Airstory is being compared to Google Docs
* The roll that cards and drag and drop functionality play in Airstory
* What integrations and extensions make Airstory so easy to use


Where to Connect with Lance, Joanna and Airstory
Airstory | Facebook | Twitter
]]>
Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 56:50
Learn WordPress Development with WPShout WPCP: 140 https://thewpchick.com/learn-wordpress-development-with-wpshout-wpcp-140/ Fri, 24 Mar 2017 14:07:35 +0000 https://thewpchick.com/?p=19731 This episode is sponsored by my web host, Liquid Web. I know, I know. You guys might be surprised that I'm sharing a way for you to Learn WordPress Development (if you've listened to the podcast intro and my "no boring code snippets here", then you know why I say this), but when I connect with great people doing awesome things, it's easy to step outside my comfort zone a little. That's what happened when I had the opportunity to speak with Alex Denning, Fred Meyer, and David Hayes of WP Shout. Fortunately, we didn't get too heavy into development speak. But we did talk about their in-depth course for anyone who wants to learn WordPress Development (and I'm going to give you a spoiler alert here, but I told them I thought the course was way underpriced. #justsayin). Questions I Asked Alex, Fred & David There are 3 of you that run the site WP Shout, but before we get into that, share your background (and the background of your partners if you want), with the listeners? When was WPShout founded? How did that come about? WPShout is focused primarily on developers. What made you guys decide to focus on that space? How have you guys monetized the site? Do you also have client projects? How have you grown your audience? Tell us about your course, Up & Running. Is this your first course? Where can people find out more about your course? What You're Going to Learn How WPShout evolved How they took their client work and started creating content with what they were doing When they first launched Up & Running (and what they've done to make the second version even better than the first one) How they came up with the pricing for Up & Running (and why I think it's underpriced, hint: get it this round) Up & Running is open now through March 31st. The guys at WPShout have agreed to give my listeners a 20% discount! Use the discount code WPCHICK at checkout. Sign Up for Up & Running Today Where to Connect with WPShout Website | Twitter | Facebook Learn-WordPress-Development

This episode is sponsored by my web host, Liquid Web.

LiquidWeb-Managed-WordPress-Hosting

I know, I know.

You guys might be surprised that I’m sharing a way for you to Learn WordPress Development (if you’ve listened to the podcast intro and my “no boring code snippets here”, then you know why I say this), but when I connect with great people doing awesome things, it’s easy to step outside my comfort zone a little.

That’s what happened when I had the opportunity to speak with Alex Denning, Fred Meyer, and David Hayes of WP Shout.

Fortunately, we didn’t get too heavy into development speak.

But we did talk about their in-depth course for anyone who wants to learn WordPress Development (and I’m going to give you a spoiler alert here, but I told them I thought the course was way underpriced. #justsayin).

Questions I Asked Alex, Fred & David

  1. There are 3 of you that run the site WP Shout, but before we get into that, share your background (and the background of your partners if you want), with the listeners?

  2. When was WPShout founded? How did that come about?

  3. WPShout is focused primarily on developers. What made you guys decide to focus on that space?

  4. How have you guys monetized the site? Do you also have client projects?

  5. How have you grown your audience?

  6. Tell us about your course, Up & Running. Is this your first course?

  7. Where can people find out more about your course?

What You’re Going to Learn

  • How WPShout evolved
  • How they took their client work and started creating content with what they were doing
  • When they first launched Up & Running (and what they’ve done to make the second version even better than the first one)
  • How they came up with the pricing for Up & Running (and why I think it’s underpriced, hint: get it this round)

Up & Running is open now through March 31st. The guys at WPShout have agreed to give my listeners a 20% discount! Use the discount code WPCHICK at checkout.

WPShout

Sign Up for Up & Running Today

Where to Connect with WPShout

Website | Twitter | Facebook

]]>
This episode is sponsored by my web host, Liquid Web. I know, I know. - You guys might be surprised that I'm sharing a way for you to Learn WordPress Development (if you've listened to the podcast intro and my "no boring code snippets here",


This episode is sponsored by my web host, Liquid Web.


I know, I know.

You guys might be surprised that I'm sharing a way for you to Learn WordPress Development (if you've listened to the podcast intro and my "no boring code snippets here", then you know why I say this), but when I connect with great people doing awesome things, it's easy to step outside my comfort zone a little.

That's what happened when I had the opportunity to speak with Alex Denning, Fred Meyer, and David Hayes of WP Shout.

Fortunately, we didn't get too heavy into development speak.

But we did talk about their in-depth course for anyone who wants to learn WordPress Development (and I'm going to give you a spoiler alert here, but I told them I thought the course was way underpriced. #justsayin).

Questions I Asked Alex, Fred & David

*
There are 3 of you that run the site WP Shout, but before we get into that, share your background (and the background of your partners if you want), with the listeners?

*
When was WPShout founded? How did that come about?

*
WPShout is focused primarily on developers. What made you guys decide to focus on that space?

*
How have you guys monetized the site? Do you also have client projects?

*
How have you grown your audience?

*
Tell us about your course, Up & Running. Is this your first course?

* Where can people find out more about your course?



What You're Going to Learn

* How WPShout evolved
* How they took their client work and started creating content with what they were doing
* When they first launched Up & Running (and what they've done to make the second version even better than the first one)
* How they came up with the pricing for Up & Running (and why I think it's underpriced, hint: get it this round)

Up & Running is open now through March 31st. The guys at WPShout have agreed to give my listeners a 20% discount! Use the discount code WPCHICK at checkout.


Sign Up for Up & Running Today
Where to Connect with WPShout
Website | Twitter | Facebook]]>
Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 60:28
You Need to Get Comfortable Selling WPCP: 139 https://thewpchick.com/you-need-to-get-comfortable-selling-wpcp-139/ Fri, 17 Mar 2017 17:09:33 +0000 https://thewpchick.com/?p=19544 This episode is sponsored by my new web host, LiquidWeb It's time we had a heart to heart. About Selling. And why you need to Get Comfortable Selling. In the past month or so I've come across this topic via conversations with people or through social media conversations (particularly in Facebook groups). We need to start looking at the real issues with online marketing and why business do or don't succeed... because for some reason this seems to be as mysterious as the Bermuda triangle. When in fact, it's SIMPLE. (notice I didn't say easy). The bottom line is that we (I'm certainly not exempt from this) over-complicate things and get bored doing the things that we can't see immediate results from. Let's start with Getting Bored The easiest way to do this is to give you some examples. I was thinking about all of the different people I've worked with over the years (for websites) and nothing was more frustrating than seeing people get caught up in the peripherals. The things on the outside/edge of their business that really don't matter or make the slightest bit of difference to the bottom line. Do your logo and colors matter? Sure. But not enough to tweak 287 times. The same is true for your products and services. I lost track of how many people spent hours and hours agonizing over the most niggly of crap but never spent the time to hit 'publish' on one single blog post. Yep, you heard me correctly. They'd spend all this time (and money) on a website they never officially 'launched' to the world. They sat waiting for things to happen (their idea of 'work' was paying to have a website created). Here's an example of what I'm talking about. Years ago (this was probably 5 years ago?) I had a client that I was building a website for. She was working with an internet marketing coach who was telling her what she needed in terms of things on her site and tools she needed to buy. This coach told her to invest in Infusionsoft (which she did) and to put together her 'packages' for her programs and what she was going to sell. So far, so good, right? WRONG. First, the coach had zero traffic strategy for getting traffic to her own website. She was still using the 'uncategorized' category in WordPress and had ZERO... I mean ZERO SEO going on in her site. Let me ask you a question. What good is an email list or packages to sell if no-one sees what you're doing?!?! (or knows you exist). Six months after we were finished working together there was still ZERO new content or anything happening on her site. Nothing new had been written. She didn't have a paid traffic strategy so she was getting zero sign-ups. Of course she was still investing in the 'coach' and other high-ticket programs, people, and events. You can buy all the courses you want. Have at it. But unless you start rolling up your sleeves and implementing, nothing is going to happen. Other than a big credit card bill and stress. Stress will rear it's ugly head in all kinds of ways.  You'll doubt yourself, feel resentment that other people seem to be 'making it' and here you are working all these hours but can't get ahead of it (or you do start making more money but your expenses increase right along with your profit). It's time to focus folks. I get it, no one wants to hear that they have to stay focused. That they need to show up and do the work. MAKE something. CREATE something. Then get eyeballs on it. Share it, email about it, ask for feedback. My preaching on this topic comes from my own painful experience of not sharing, promoting and selling sooner. This really isn't rocket science. Over-Complicating Things So apparently it's conference season. Funnel Hacking Live just wrapped up a week or two ago (ClickFunnels annual event) and this week Digital Marketer's annual Traffic and Conversion summit (T&C) wrapped up. Comfortable-selling

This episode is sponsored by my new web host, LiquidWeb

LiquidWeb-Managed-WordPress-Hosting

It’s time we had a heart to heart.

About Selling.

And why you need to Get Comfortable Selling.

In the past month or so I’ve come across this topic via conversations with people or through social media conversations (particularly in Facebook groups).

We need to start looking at the real issues with online marketing and why business do or don’t succeed… because for some reason this seems to be as mysterious as the Bermuda triangle.

When in fact, it’s SIMPLE.

(notice I didn’t say easy).

The bottom line is that we (I’m certainly not exempt from this) over-complicate things and get bored doing the things that we can’t see immediate results from.

Let’s start with Getting Bored

The easiest way to do this is to give you some examples.

I was thinking about all of the different people I’ve worked with over the years (for websites) and nothing was more frustrating than seeing people get caught up in the peripherals. The things on the outside/edge of their business that really don’t matter or make the slightest bit of difference to the bottom line.

Do your logo and colors matter? Sure. But not enough to tweak 287 times.

The same is true for your products and services.

I lost track of how many people spent hours and hours agonizing over the most niggly of crap but never spent the time to hit ‘publish’ on one single blog post.

Yep, you heard me correctly.

They’d spend all this time (and money) on a website they never officially ‘launched’ to the world.

They sat waiting for things to happen (their idea of ‘work’ was paying to have a website created).

Here’s an example of what I’m talking about.

Years ago (this was probably 5 years ago?) I had a client that I was building a website for. She was working with an internet marketing coach who was telling her what she needed in terms of things on her site and tools she needed to buy. This coach told her to invest in Infusionsoft (which she did) and to put together her ‘packages’ for her programs and what she was going to sell.

So far, so good, right?

WRONG.

First, the coach had zero traffic strategy for getting traffic to her own website. She was still using the ‘uncategorized’ category in WordPress and had ZERO… I mean ZERO SEO going on in her site.

Let me ask you a question.

What good is an email list or packages to sell if no-one sees what you’re doing?!?! (or knows you exist).

Six months after we were finished working together there was still ZERO new content or anything happening on her site. Nothing new had been written. She didn’t have a paid traffic strategy so she was getting zero sign-ups. Of course she was still investing in the ‘coach’ and other high-ticket programs, people, and events.

You can buy all the courses you want.

Have at it.

But unless you start rolling up your sleeves and implementing, nothing is going to happen.

Other than a big credit card bill and stress.

Stress will rear it’s ugly head in all kinds of ways.  You’ll doubt yourself, feel resentment that other people seem to be ‘making it’ and here you are working all these hours but can’t get ahead of it (or you do start making more money but your expenses increase right along with your profit).

It’s time to focus folks.

I get it, no one wants to hear that they have to stay focused.

That they need to show up and do the work.

MAKE something. CREATE something.

Then get eyeballs on it. Share it, email about it, ask for feedback.

My preaching on this topic comes from my own painful experience of not sharing, promoting and selling sooner.

This really isn’t rocket science.

Over-Complicating Things

So apparently it’s conference season.

Funnel Hacking Live just wrapped up a week or two ago (ClickFunnels annual event) and this week Digital Marketer’s annual Traffic and Conversion summit (T&C) wrapped up.

I’ve been to both events in the past (well, T&C was only for a minute, it was on the tail end of a mastermind event and I was fried and wanted to go home, so I left. I had enough in my brain already without adding new tactics) and even though I bought tickets to the second Funnel Hacking Live event (which was 2016) at the first one (the very first Funnel Hacking Live event was in 2015), I didn’t go.

Same reason.

I was fried. Last year was a long year for me and I did a lot of re-evaluating in my personal life and my business.

I actually like going to events. I love learning new things and love the energy of connecting with other people. But the timing has to be right.

I’m getting so much more mileage out of mastering what I already know how to do (and have plenty to keep me busy) that I know in order to reach my goals I need to stay focused.

You guys have followed me with content and email marketing. You know I do it consistently and that I’m a big fan (because it works).

Do I do other things? Absolutely, but I do them for the right reasons.

I see soooo many people get caught up in the things for the wrong reasons. Things such as:

  • Complicated funnels
  • Upsells / down sells
  • Social media tactics
  • Facebook advertising
  • Jumping into ecommerce
  • JV partnerships
  • Affiliate marketing
  • Podcasting
  • Video marketing

This is just to name a few.

None of these things in and of themselves are wrong, but pick something and do it well.

Do it consistently.

Master that before getting into the more complicated step.

Here’s another example I can give you.

I recently did a post on how to create a quiz in WordPress with the Thrive Quiz Builder. The post has 6 videos and is a step-by-step guide on creating a quiz for lead generation.

Once you start creating your quiz you’ll see that you can get pretty involved in something called ‘branching’. Branching allows you to create new paths based on your quiz takers answers. So if your question has 3 answers you can create 3 new paths with separate questions specific to those answers (see how quickly this can get complicated?).

In this post, the suggestion I gave was to create a SIMPLE quiz and get it converting.

Worry about branching later (if at all).

When Gordan and I started talking about creating LeadSurveys this was a HUGE factor for me. It had to be simple to use while getting quality results.

I’ve seen another tool on the market (I’m not going to give out the name) that has a WAY higher price tag and looks ridiculously involved. It reminds me of Infusionsoft (er, Confusionsoft, which btw, Russell Brunson and his team actually had t-shirts created that say “We’re not #Confusionsoft and he wore them at their last event).

I don’t remember the terminology that tool used, but as soon as I saw it I thought ‘this is ridiculous’.

Most people don’t have a basic opt-in funnel up that converts well.

KEEP IT SIMPLE.

Don’t worry about whether or not you have an upsell on your product… get your product /course up for sale.

THEN worry about the upsell.

Remember, ever business needs only three things:

  1. Offers
  2. Leads
  3. Sales

Content (which I clearly believe in), social media, networking, marketing…. all of that effort should support your offers by getting you leads and sales (broken record much?).

I did this recenlty with my Content Strategy Beta Workshop.

I kept it simple.

I kept it small, made the offer (emailed all of two times) and ran a live 4 week course where I created it as I went. It was very hands on (I ended up doing two calls with each individual), but I got massive feedback (invaluable) and am drilling down deeper for next time. I’m going to run that again at the end of the month as one more ‘beta’ round and then it’s going to be a signature course.

What did I use to create the course?

Google Docs, Demio webinar platform, a private Facebook Group and Kajabi (I already had an account).

I kept it simple.

Now that I’ve done it, I’m breaking each week into smaller videos (week one has 8 modules in it, shorter videos, resources are easier to find, etc.).

And anyone who has done the beta course gets lifetime access (this course will just get better and better).

I didn’t spend months creating crazy modules, plans, downloads, etc. I outlined the course, knew how I wanted to approach it, which tools I would use as part of my recommendations and jumped in.

If you’re honest about what you’re doing people are fine with it. In fact, I think  people being part of the ‘ground floor’ so to speak is appealing. They get more one-on-one attention than they would in a normal course.

BUT…. guess what?

I still had to make the offer.

I had to let people know I had something for sale.

I’ve been building my audience and connecting with people for NINE years now (it doesn’t take this long… it took me a while to fully step into this brand, but that’s for another episode).

Stop Over-Complicating things.

Take the time to connect with people.

Find out what their problems are.

Make things to solve their problems.

Offer them for sale.

]]>
This episode is sponsored by my new web host, LiquidWeb - It's time we had a heart to heart. - About Selling. And why you need to Get Comfortable Selling. In the past month or so I've come across this topic via conversations with people or thr... This episode is sponsored by my new web host, LiquidWeb



It's time we had a heart to heart.

About Selling.
And why you need to Get Comfortable Selling.
In the past month or so I've come across this topic via conversations with people or through social media conversations (particularly in Facebook groups).

We need to start looking at the real issues with online marketing and why business do or don't succeed... because for some reason this seems to be as mysterious as the Bermuda triangle.

When in fact, it's SIMPLE.

(notice I didn't say easy).

The bottom line is that we (I'm certainly not exempt from this) over-complicate things and get bored doing the things that we can't see immediate results from.

Let's start with Getting Bored

The easiest way to do this is to give you some examples.

I was thinking about all of the different people I've worked with over the years (for websites) and nothing was more frustrating than seeing people get caught up in the peripherals. The things on the outside/edge of their business that really don't matter or make the slightest bit of difference to the bottom line.

Do your logo and colors matter? Sure. But not enough to tweak 287 times.

The same is true for your products and services.

I lost track of how many people spent hours and hours agonizing over the most niggly of crap but never spent the time to hit 'publish' on one single blog post.

Yep, you heard me correctly.

They'd spend all this time (and money) on a website they never officially 'launched' to the world.

They sat waiting for things to happen (their idea of 'work' was paying to have a website created).

Here's an example of what I'm talking about.

Years ago (this was probably 5 years ago?) I had a client that I was building a website for. She was working with an internet marketing coach who was telling her what she needed in terms of things on her site and tools she needed to buy. This coach told her to invest in Infusionsoft (which she did) and to put together her 'packages' for her programs and what she was going to sell.

So far, so good, right?

WRONG.

First, the coach had zero traffic strategy for getting traffic to her own website. She was still using the 'uncategorized' category in WordPress and had ZERO... I mean ZERO SEO going on in her site.

Let me ask you a question.

What good is an email list or packages to sell if no-one sees what you're doing?!?! (or knows you exist).

Six months after we were finished working together there was still ZERO new content or anything happening on her site. Nothing new had been written. She didn't have a paid traffic strategy so she was getting zero sign-ups. Of course she was still investing in the 'coach' and other high-ticket programs, people, and events.

You can buy all the courses you want.

Have at it.



But unless you start rolling up your sleeves and implementing, nothing is going to happen.

Other than a big credit card bill and stress.

Stress will rear it's ugly head in all kinds of ways.  You'll doubt yourself, feel resentment that other people seem to be 'making it' and here you are working all these hours but can't get ahead of it (or you do start making more money but your expenses increase right along with your profit).

It's time to focus folks.

I get it, no one wants to hear that they have to stay focused.

That they need to show up and do the work.

MAKE something. CREATE something.

]]>
Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 51:45
Daily Email Works. Period. Interview with Ben Settle WPCP: 138 https://thewpchick.com/daily-email-works-period-interview-with-ben-settle-wpcp-138/ Fri, 10 Mar 2017 17:36:18 +0000 https://thewpchick.com/?p=19498 Ben Settle is the reason I started my daily emails (er, almost daily emails). I don't remember where I initially came across Ben Settle, but you guys have heard me talk about him enough to know that following his method of daily emailing is one of the best things I've done for my business. I was a subscriber of Ben's for about a year before I became a customer. Ben sells a monthly physical newsletter called Email Players (as well as a few other products and books). To say I look forward to getting my Email Players every month would be an understatement. I don't know if it's the little kid in me or what, but I love getting that physical newsletter in my mailbox. I guess I'm probably a little old school as well because I still like holding something physical from time to time (as opposed to just a digital version). Tactics vs. Strategies This was one of those things I needed to learn through experience. It's also something I see soooo many people doing with their online businesses. I think it might be a right of passage or part of the process, but if you want to cut your learning curve down by years then stop chasing something you think will be 'it' for you. A course, a guru, a tactic or a platform. None of these things alone will give you the business you want. You might have a quick win or a little success with one of these tactics, but taking the time to really learn and understand direct response marketing (good copy, conversions, content, sales) will create a compound effect. This was what Ben did for me. First, he made receiving email fun again. No, he didn't add a new "you've got mail" ping to my inbox. He provided entertaining copy that made me want to open his emails. Once I started reading (consuming) the emails regularly I realized I was also learning a ton in the process. Ben was doing something I hadn't seen anyone else do. He was selling in every single email. And I still wanted to open them, every day. I didn't get offended by his selling, I just kept reading until I was ready to buy (which remember, it was a full year before I jumped in). I've gotten more validation, more engagement, and more responses to what I'm doing since implementing El Benbo's methods (this is how he refers to himself from time to time) than I ever have before. The best part? I'm having more fun in my business than I ever have. Literally, like EVER. O.K., let's jump into the interview. Questions I Asked Ben Let's talk email. Can you talk about the daily email philosophy and why it works so well? What are the biggest objections you hear from people about emailing daily? Why do you think people freak out so much about selling daily as well? This probably isn't a surprise to the audience, but you do things a little different. You don't worry about open rates, click through rates or any of the stuff that so many marketing 'guru's' preach about. Why don't these things matter (like we think they do?)? You don't seem to do a lot of marketing for your brand (in terms of ads, webinars, JV's, etc.), yet you have a very successful business. How do you market your business? What do you tell someone who doesn't have something to sell yet? What You're Going to Learn What Weng Chun Kung Fu has in common with email marketing The concept of being 'un O.K.' How to listen correctly to your subscribers and sell them what they want, even if they don't know what that is Why Ben has renamed the internet troll 'Lennox' The real reason people aren't clicking the links in your emails The roll timing plays in your emails (not the time of day you send them, but the timing in the lives of your subscribers) I have to tell you that I had just as much fun listening to this interview as I did when I recorded it. Here's my suggestion to you when it comes to daily email. Step into it in a way that works for you. If you're currently emailing once a week, Ben Settle is the reason I started my daily emails (er, almost daily emails). I don't remember where I initially came across Ben Settle, but you guys have heard me talk about him enough to know that following his method of daily emailing is one of the... Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 52:48 Easily Simplify Your Business & The Tools I’m Crazy Excited About Right Now WPCP: 137 https://thewpchick.com/easily-simplify-your-business-the-tools-im-crazy-excited-about-right-now-wpcp-137/ Fri, 03 Mar 2017 15:00:35 +0000 https://thewpchick.com/?p=18958 There was a time when simplifying my business felt like giving up. What is it about our culture (at least western culture), that we can't shake the 'no pain no gain' mentality? Why does it feel like things have to be hard to be worth anything? Fortunately, those days are behind me. Now I feel like I've won the time lottery (it exists in my head, just go with it). I was talking with a friend recently and I realized how everything I've done in my business has brought me to exactly where I am now and it feels so right. Let's take a brief stroll down memory lane and we can look at all the iterations of my business. I've come full circle to what it is I really wanted to do (and this path has prepared me to step into this next phase). I've mentioned a bunch of times that my intention when I started my business was to be an information marketer. I had zero technical skills, no idea about creating websites and had only played with WordPress.com. All I knew was that I was fascinated by online business and knew I had to make it work. I needed to work for myself and pretty much committed to never going back to retail management again (we won't talk about my stint in real estate or insurance, because... yawn). I'd had my fair share of attempts at other businesses: MLM (my guess is a LOT of entrepreneurs have been down this path at one time or another) Contract recruiting for retail Physical retail scrapbook store Loan & Real Estate agent Insurance agent Dang. Makes me tired thinking of everything that went into each of those ventures. Especially the real estate and loan agents, because again, they were a little dry for me (and I am SO not good at being at anyone's beck and call). Once I connected with this whole online business thing it was like coming home. I couldn't get enough of it. I was consuming as much information as I could, with a bunch of words I had zero understanding of but it clicked (pun intended). I KNEW it was possible. Fast forward 9 years and here are the different paths I've been down that have brought me to exactly where I am today (I can't really give you a definitive timeline, but know that it started in 2008 and has brought me to 2017) Up until 2017 I was still offering websites for clients: Long story short, I've come back to to the fundamentals of what I wanted to do in the first place. Is it easier for me now than it would have been even 5 years ago? Absolutely. I have an audience and I know so much more. I'm not weighed down by the challenges of making the technology fit. However, I will tell you that I had I stayed the course of doing what I knew I was supposed to keep doing (i.e., not getting sidetracked by shiny things) my business would probably be in a different place today. That's not a judgment, simply reminding you of the role you play in getting to where you want to go. I also know I'm much more confident in my abilities and how I want to run my business today than I was 5 years ago. As much as I like having a nice income from my business, the freedom to enjoy the fruits of my labor has to be there too. And it wasn't. I had created a business that had more overhead (salaries) than I had ever wanted and I felt like I was in a constant state of chasing something. The big launch, the big lifestyle, the big high-ticket offer, the big 'whatever the latest guru is preaching' thing.... Before you start thinking I'm anti the big lifestyle (or however that may come across), at the end of the day I'm not anti-anything except for what doesn't work for ME. I had some amazing experiences but I'm not driven but flashy stuff. The houses, cars, planes, watches... none of it gets me excited. Don't get me wrong, I like nice things, but I'm way more inspired by experiences (travel) and freedom. But I found myself feeling like I needed to keep up with a lot of that and have all kinds of funnels, strategies, campaigns, There was a time when simplifying my business felt like giving up. What is it about our culture (at least western culture), that we can't shake the 'no pain no gain' mentality? Why does it feel like things have to be hard to be worth anything? - Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 58:52 Nightmare Clients and Growing Your Business with Erin Flynn WPCP: 136 https://thewpchick.com/nightmare-clients-and-growing-your-business-with-erin-flynn-wpcp-136/ Sat, 25 Feb 2017 00:19:37 +0000 https://thewpchick.com/?p=18926 Erin Flynn has mastered something we've ALL encountered at one time or another... how to deal with nightmare clients. Not only does she help you grow your freelance business but how about how to handle those clients that make you want to quit what you're doing? (Kinda makes you want to send her a virtual hug already, doesn't it?). I was fortunate to connect to Erin through a mutual friend, Curtis McHale (who I had on the podcast a couple months ago). Erin does a lot more than just help you deal with nightmare clients (although of course, that was one of the things I had to delve deeper into. We've ALL been there and have that crazy story of working with someone that made our lives a living hell). Erin has built up her own business (design and websites) and is growing it through a membership program (which she has a free membership also) and courses. I love it. Erin has been involved in web design since she was 13 and building Sailor Moon fan sites (the beauty of growing up with technology, huh?). After college, she went out and got a job (like we're all 'supposed' to do) and ended up hating it. She hated it so much that she literally just quit one day (something I know many people would love to be able to do). Fortunately, she's figured out the freelancing space and is sharing her knowledge and skills with other people so you can avoid some of the mistakes she's made. She's now transitioning to an agency and has tons of training available to help you grow your business and position yourself as an expert. Questions I Asked Erin I always want to know what led someone down the entrepreneurial path. Have you always worked for yourself? What brought you here? What is your current business? You have courses & workshops, did you start with services? Let's talk about Nightmare Clients. What made you decide to offer help with this? I love the "screen, prevent, fire"... can you explain what that is? You also have a membership for growing your business. Can you share a little bit about the Unstoppable Expedition? What would you recommend to someone who wants to start a membership? What's on the horizon for you this year? What You're Going to Learn How Erin approaches everything in her business How a conversation on Twitter turned into a community on Facebook How her communication skills led to her first product that sold a few hundred right out the gate Why positioning yourself as the expert is key when starting a new project Why Erin thinks you should work with a couple nightmare clients (hint: boundaries) Where to Connect with Erin Website | Twitter | Facebook Erin Flynn has mastered something we've ALL encountered at one time or another... how to deal with nightmare clients. Not only does she help you grow your freelance business but how about how to handle those clients that make you want to quit what you... Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 54:02 Continuing the Conversation About LeadSurveys with Gordan Orlic WPCP: 135 https://thewpchick.com/continuing-the-conversation-about-leadsurveys-with-gordan-orlic-wpcp-135/ Sun, 19 Feb 2017 18:36:13 +0000 https://thewpchick.com/?p=18457 This week I continued my conversation with Gordan Orlic, my partner with LeadSurveys. Like I said in the podcast last week, this has been a massive education for me (what that I'm loving) and each step of the way gets me more and more excited about LeadSurveys. This week I wanted to talk about all the pieces that have had to come together, such as servers, payment gateways, payment processors, etc. This will probably open your eyes a bit to how this all works when it comes to the tools and apps you use in your own business. We also talked about the branding and marketing, how that's evolving and our "Name the Fox" contest! Yes, we have an awesome mascot that is a fox, but she needs a name. Here's the full conversation with Gordan (transcripts): Kim: [00:00:25] Hey what's up everybody. Welcome to the second official conversations of Kim. This is part 2 from last week. Listen to the conversation with Gordon Orlic and I am we are talking about lead surveys and and how that all started. We're going to pick up that conversation today because we have a lot that we did not cover. Gordon what's up. Thanks for being here. Gordan: [00:00:46] Hey thank you for having me again. Kim: [00:00:50] Everybody after after last week I'm putting the transcripts in and realizing we talked a lot. That was a lot of words that was fun. So today we're going to go over. I think we're going to start with the direction of getting started. So for everybody who didn't listen last week I'd recommend going back and listening to how Leadsurveys came about. The idea of it. You know what we started looking at the different the different tools that we looked at but just what we wanted to do to differentiate lead surveys from other things in the market why we wanted to do this. All that good stuff. So that's all in last week's episode. So let's kind of start with the next step which would be what needs to come together in terms of the different pieces. And obviously this most of this is going to in your Gordan. But there was a lot this has been such an education for me. But all of the things that needed to come together before we could even we meaning you get into coding and I'll talk about the content and marketing and stuff so the different things that we had a look at Kim: [00:01:58] We're obviously merchant accounts but the processing of recurring payments in this space is different than say just a membership right. So what did you need to look at Gordon to get that. And can you share where we ended up. Gordan: [00:02:12] Yeah sure. Gordan: [00:02:13] So in essence today it's infinitely more easier to take money from people legally obviously than it was five years ago. Gordan: [00:02:28] You have Paypal and stripe and all of these different card processors. And just by glancing at things you would think that you can have things set up in five minutes. So just click click next next. Open an account give them your bank account number and you can start receiving payments. And that is true. Gordan: [00:02:53] However as with anything in life if you have certain demands if you have certain things that you know that you need then all of a sudden you don't have 22 things available to you. You have maybe one or two. And even with those two you're going to have to make some compromises for us. One of the main things we decided from the get go is that we wanted to accept both paypal and credit cards. Gordan: [00:03:25] So just by having those requirements you have cut off a lot of different possibilities. For instance a lot of companies that offer a processing of payments you Stripe. Stripe only accepts credit cards. So for us that would mean that we have to have two systems one system based on stripe to accept credit cards and another system where payment to Paypal sorry to accept paypal payments. So is that doable. Obviously it's doable but then we have two systems. Double the maintenance double the cost double the processing ... This week I continued my conversation with Gordan Orlic, my partner with LeadSurveys. - Like I said in the podcast last week, this has been a massive education for me (what that I'm loving) and each step of the way gets me more and more excited about ... Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 1:05:33 The Story Behind LeadSurveys – Part 1 WPCP: 134 https://thewpchick.com/the-story-behind-leadsurveys-part-1-wpcp-134/ Fri, 10 Feb 2017 22:44:21 +0000 https://thewpchick.hytivvx2-liquidwebsites.com/?p=18048 The Story Behind LeadSurveys is my first official "Conversations with Kim" episode. These are going to be a little different than my normal interviews (and obviously won't be solo shows). It's a more organic conversation about a topic as opposed to interviewing someone about their business. Kim: [00:00:25] Hey what's up everybody. Welcome to the official first conversations with Kim WordPress Chick podcast episode. I don't know how I'm going to word this or or flow with it so bear with me. This is sort of a new test but this really came about specifically because of this project I'm doing and having some conversations with friends where I'm like I just want to have a little bit more organic flow to to some of the things that I want to talk about that a relative obviously to online marketing to our businesses whether it's mindset, product development, you know Course creation content whatever. So let me know what you guys think. I would love some feedback today though. We're going to do a little deep dive with something that I'm working on and today I have Gordan Orlic. Gordan you rock. Thanks for being here. Gordan: [00:01:13] You're welcome. A pleasure to be here. Kim: [00:01:16] All right. So for everybody listening if you've not heard this I had Gordon on the show and it was mid-year last year going into summer and it was of course summer summer summer ish. OK. So Gordon runs what factory owners say factory Ltd dotcom and they are software developers and I'm going to link to that episode. But what I want to do is we're going to fast forward. Gordon and I he had he had asked me they do a lot of white labeling of Wordpress plugins and software and had said oh do you have any ideas and I had no idea we were kind of working on playing with it and I just couldn't get super excited it was a WordPress plugin so. But Gordon has been ridiculously patient with me and I don't know Gordon. Have you seen the difference between my excitement for lead surveys and the first project. Gordan: [00:02:04] Oh definitely. Definitely yeah. It didn't sound like a bad project. I still don't think it's a bad project but this one is better. Kim: [00:02:14] I agree and you know it's funny because I had a couple of people that I talked to about the first project were like when is it coming in. Like well. It's on the backburner for now. So this came about because of a massive frustration and I should probably tell everybody we're talking about LeadSurveys.io. I know which is a web app. And so Gordon and I you know we stayed in touch you know about the project and then one day I was like. So what about a webapp. So before we get into lead surveys and everything that's going on behind it because this has been a massive learning curve for me and you know for everybody listening if you've ever thought about software development you're going to want to take notes or I'll put the transcripts in the post because I feel like I've got like I'm in kindergarten. Like writing to Gordon. Well what about this and how do we do this and it's kind of a rabbit hole but it's been awesome. Kim: [00:03:12] So Gordon prior to this had you guys done webapps I'm so sorry for forgetting that but had you guys some web apps before. Gordan: [00:03:21] We only did one. which was a what's called a semi web app because it was still basically a repressed plugin but the part of it was plucked out in order to keep the code safe. So you still needed the WordPress plugin but I'd say some of the calculations were done on a centralized server. In order for it to be hidden from you know praying eyes.So some sort of a mix between a WordPress plugin and a SaaS. Kim: [00:03:54] Well and how many plugins? Kim: [00:03:57] I always tell people I'm like 30 plus. And I don't know how many white label things you guys have done. Gordan: [00:04:01] No it's its boards border lining 1000. Kim: [00:04:05] Oh my lord. Gordan: [00:04:07] No no it's seriously huge amou... The Story Behind LeadSurveys is my first official "Conversations with Kim" episode. These are going to be a little different than my normal interviews (and obviously won't be solo shows). It's a more organic conversation about a topic as opposed to in... Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 1:02:51 Demio: A Webinar Platform to Love with David Abrams WPCP: 133 https://thewpchick.com/demio-a-webinar-platform-to-love-with-david-abrams-wpcp-133/ Sun, 05 Feb 2017 20:19:35 +0000 https://thewpchick.hytivvx2-liquidwebsites.com/?p=17756 It's been a long time since I've run a webinar. For years I had a subscription to GoToWebinar and would run webinars every now and then. It's probably not a huge surprise that I enjoy hosting webinars... it's kind of like podcasting while sharing your screen (a little crude description, but you get my point). I've taken my fair share of courses on webinars and have hired someone specifically to help me with my webinars. I got a little frustrated running webinars because so many people would register and not attend, even though I know it's pretty much a standard to have about 30% attendance rate. Needless to say, I finally cancelled my account with GoToWebinar because I was paying for something I wasn't using. Since then I've tried a handful of other webinar platforms, most run on Google hangouts. I'm not a fan of Google hangouts and the delay. I know this technology is just going to keep getting better, but I couldn't ever get excited about using the platform (I think I have 3 different webinar platforms that run off of Google hangouts... I went as far as setting up test webinars, trying the platform but never promoting it). Hence my lack of webinars the past couple years. Until now. Enter Demio. Holy moly. I watched the Demio launch and thought about jumping in but knew I wouldn't be running any webinars anytime soon (mistake on my part... it was a lifetime price, I wish I had jumped in). What brought me back to taking another look at Demio was after watching a virtual summit on launching a SaaS product (a little bit of an obsession for me lately with LeadSurveys coming). I registered for one of Demio's webinars and knew it was time to get back into webinars. I reached out to David Abrams, one of the founders of Demio, for a podcast interview and the rest as they say, is history. Questions I Asked David  Before we talk about Demio, what were you & your partner doing before launching this? How did you and your partner connect to create Demio? Explain to the listeners what Demio is? What made you decide to 'take on' the webinar space? I watched your interview for the virtual summit for The Foundation. You guys spent a lot of time and money on this project. What were some of the challenges you faced? How did you guys decide on the pricing for Demio? What would you recommend to someone who wants to launch a SaaS? What You're Going to Learn What software the Demio team was working on when they decided to pivot and go all in with Demio The technology that Demio runs on and how it works right within your browser What features Demio launched with Why they decided to keep the UI clean and streamlined How the launch as been for Demio and what is working to get the word out Why Demio is going with 'like live' webinars instead of webinars that seem like they're live, but include fake registrations and chat (something they're against) What's coming for Demio in 2017 Connect with Demio Website | Twitter It's been a long time since I've run a webinar. - For years I had a subscription to GoToWebinar and would run webinars every now and then. It's probably not a huge surprise that I enjoy hosting webinars... Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 47:29 Course Creation, A Little Rant & An Effortless Start to 2017 WPCP: 132 https://thewpchick.com/course-creation-a-little-rant-an-effortless-start-to-2017-wpcp-132/ Fri, 27 Jan 2017 16:26:34 +0000 https://thewpchick.hytivvx2-liquidwebsites.com/?p=17710 Course Creation does NOT have to be difficult. I know that's saying a lot, but there are simpler ways to go about creating courses that won't leave you feeling like you need a PhD to get it launched. But before we get into course creation, I've got a little bit of a rant today. This is what happens when you have a platform and an awesome audience that goes along the journey with you. Every now and then your audience may get more than they bargained for. My Little Rant I've had some interesting experiences lately and something has become glaringly apparent to me. On one hand, things are shifting and changing massively in this space (I'll get more into that in a minute). On the other hand, people are people. No matter what we do when there are people involved there's going to be a certain amount of psychological factors that come into play with any interaction. Especially when you bring money into the equation. We all have our own money story and we bring it with us to every interaction. What I don't understand is how people think starting an online business isn't going to take WORK. Is it simply that they've read great copy? Bought amazing products? The promise of riches? Probably a combination of all of the above. But I've got news for people who 'buy' into this.... First, there's nothing wrong with you. You're human. I don't know anyone who loves the idea of having to put in hours and hours of work in hopes of it paying off. There's no crystal ball. You can work your arse off and still not make a penny. Trust me, I've been there and done it. When that happens you have to look at the type of work you're doing. There are so many ways you can keep yourself busy 'doing work', but let's be honest. We both know what is and isn't going to pay the bills. Spending hours, weeks or months planning and preparing things isn't work. It's procrastination. At some point you have to make an offer. Oh... and of course you need people to make that offer to. It's better to start building a list of subscribers and potential customers from DAY ONE than to wait until something is perfect. Don't have a lead magnet? Google how to create one. Make a list of TEN things you can offer as a lead magnet. Close Facebook, close Gmail, turn your phone off and open a word doc. Start writing. Start recording. MAKE something of value you can give in exchange for someone's name and email address. This is only hard because you're making it hard. You've made a decision somewhere along the line that you don't have something that can help someone else. That's bullshit. EVERY single one of us has experiences, stories, lessons, hacks, tips, tricks.... whatever. Simply share something that made your life easier and you feel will provide value to your audience. Don't have an audience? Define who you want them to be. Don't tell me you don't know who. Google 'how to create a customer avatar'. It's not 1990 folks. Stop waiting for someone to come in and do the work for you. You guys know how I feel about 'Hustle'.... and I still live by #FtheHustle. But being sick of all the hype around the 'hustle and grind' movement does not mean I don't do the work. Stop looking outside of yourself for answers. Creating a real business online takes time, energy, effort, work, investment, consistency, and initiative. It has never been easier to get a business started. But no one is going to do it for you. End rant. Let's move onto Course Creation I've created a handful of courses over the last 8+ years. And I can tell you without a doubt that I always made it WAY more difficult than it had to be. I did the exact same thing many of you have probably done. I mapped it out, had all kinds of cool branding and graphics created, planned the how and when, decided on the platform, started creating content. Then when all was said and done, I'd launch it (offer it once or twice is more like it)... Course Creation does NOT have to be difficult. I know that's saying a lot, but there are simpler ways to go about creating courses that won't leave you feeling like you need a PhD to get it launched. - But before we get into course creation, Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 1:04:30 Niching Down with Nate Wright – Theme of The Crop WPCP: 131 https://thewpchick.com/niching-down-with-nate-wright-theme-of-the-crop-wpcp-131/ Mon, 23 Jan 2017 18:59:14 +0000 https://thewpchick.hytivvx2-liquidwebsites.com/?p=17693 Building a business with WordPress can feel a little challenging at times. As websites become more of a commodity it can feel a little like an uphill battle when you build websites with WordPress (and is personally one of the reasons I'm not doing service work anymore). I've said for a long time that I still believe there are great opportunities in the WordPress space to build a solid, profitable business. But it's going to look different than it did a few years ago. With more people 'building' WordPress websites (I use the term 'builder' instead of developer because there are so many tools available to make this process easier that you really don't have to be a developer to build sites for people anymore), it's imperative that you carve out your own niche within this market. If you're a 'builder' or developer, I still think the documentation space is wide open. There are plenty of things you can create training and content around that can provide a great income, provided you stick with it and market it consistently (there's the magic word, right? It's all about consistency). Today's guest has done just that with his business. He's picked a niche within this space and has created products (themes and plugins) that are specific to one niche. The Restaurant & Bar space. Nate Wright of Theme of the Crop joined me to talk about how he's niched down within WordPress and where he's headed. Questions I Asked Nate Before we get into Theme of The Crop, what brought you here? What were you doing before you launched this? Can you explain to the listeners what Theme of The Crop is and what differentiates your themes and plugins from everyone else? What made you decide to focus on restaurants, cafe's and bars? What was it like to take on something like online reservations when there are companies out there like Open Table who are established in that space? How do you market your business? What would you recommend to someone who wants to niche down in the WordPress space the way you've done? What's coming this year for Theme of the Crop? What You're Going to Learn How Nate's job as a journalist helped him realize what he didn't like doing How rejection through a popular theme marketplace drove him to build his own shop How long it took Nate to sell his first theme (and why he stuck with it) Who Nate's target audience is... and why it's not simply 'any restaurant' owner (he's drilled even deeper into his niche) How he's used the WordPress.org plugin repository to grow his premium plugins Why Nate is focusing more on content and marketing Where to Connect with Nate Website | Twitter   Building a business with WordPress can feel a little challenging at times. - As websites become more of a commodity it can feel a little like an uphill battle when you build websites with WordPress (and is personally one of the reasons I'm not doing s... Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 48:24 Repurposing Your Content with Hani Mourra & His New Platform WPCP: 130 https://thewpchick.com/repurposing-content-hani-mourra-new-platform-wpcp-130/ Fri, 13 Jan 2017 20:05:14 +0000 https://thewpchick.hytivvx2-liquidwebsites.com/?p=17661 No matter what you do to repurpose your content, there's always more you can do. I know, that might sound a little depressing or overwhelming (how much more can you possibly do, right?), but the good news is that there is a lot of automation happening in this space and tools that are coming out to streamline this process. Which is why I was super excited to have Hani Mourra back on the podcast this week. If you haven't listened to my previous episode with Hani, you can listen to that here. Hani is the creator of the Simple Podcast Press plugin as well as a couple other WordPress plugins. Hani has launched a new SaaS platform called Repurpose.io. Repurpose does exactly what you think it would do, it repurposes your content. Not all of your content, but for those of you who create audio and video content, you're going to want to jump into this as soon as possible. Repurpose is currently by invitation only, but not from the exclusive sense. The first founders will get access in February (yes, I'm super excited to be one of those founders). Hani wants to make sure everything is working smoothly and the initial adopters are up and running (smart process). Questions I asked Hani What have you been up to since our last interview? (we had to catch up a little bit) For the listeners who may not be familiar with you, can you share a little about your business and what your WordPress plugins are? Let's talk about Repurpose.io. What made you decide to launch a web app for this as opposed to a WordPress plugin? How has creating this product differed from creating a WordPress plugin? How did you decide on pricing for your platform? Can you explain what Repurpose.io is? Where can people find out more about Repurpose.io? What You're Going to Learn Why Hani decided to go with a web app as opposed to a WordPress plugin How he's decided which features to launch Repurpose with Why he considers Repurpose a platform as opposed to a web app Which integrations Repurpose will launch with Why Hani considers himself an 'automation freak' When you can get access to Repurpose.io (and where) To say I'm excited about Repurpose.io would be an understatement. I have always loved repurposing content, this just gives me a way to automate it and measure which channels give me the best ROI. Where to Connect with Hani Facebook | Twitter | Repurpose.io *Transcripts coming soon* No matter what you do to repurpose your content, there's always more you can do. I know, that might sound a little depressing or overwhelming (how much more can you possibly do, right?), but the good news is that there is a lot of automation happening... Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 54:00 2016 Year in Review & Why I’m So Excited About 2017 WPCP: 128 https://thewpchick.com/2016-year-in-review-why-im-so-excited-about-2017-wpcp-128/ Fri, 30 Dec 2016 18:33:54 +0000 https://thewpchick.hytivvx2-liquidwebsites.com/?p=17538 I've been thinking a lot about how to approach my 2016 Year in Review episode. Like many other people, this year has felt particularly long. I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that this was a record year for celebrity deaths and crappy politics. I promise not to go into either, although the celebrity deaths, particularly a couple of the musicians we lost this year reminds you how short life is because their music can take you back to a time and place in your life instantly. Both Prince and George Michael were huge when I was in high school (we had some fun music in the 80's). I lip-synced songs by both musicians at school (one was for a dance and one was at an assembly, in front of the entire school... wasn't shy back then either). All that being said, the last thing I want to do is write about or focus on the negativity... we've all had plenty of that and it's time to turn the page on it. My intention with this episode and post is to look back as objectively as I can, acknowledge what worked, what didn't, and share why I'm so excited about 2017. The easiest way for me to break down 2016 is in chunks... we'll look at each quarter of the year (hopefully I can remember everything worth sharing without having to go back to a calendar). First Quarter of 2016 It's a little crazy when I think about what was happening at the beginning of 2016 and where I was headed (compared to where I am). I had hired Jason Hornung to create a Facebook ad strategy for my 'podcasting done for you' service. We started working together in December of 2015 and in January I flew back to Wisconsin to spend a few days with him and a few other entrepreneurs as we worked through our ad campaigns, strategies, copy, and funnels. The whole enchilada. To say it was an intense (but amazing) few days is an understatement. I learned a TON about Facebook ads in general (and will be going back to his training when I get ready to launch my next campaign), had a very successful campaign (more on that in a minute), and walked away with an education unlike anything else I had experienced. What I mean by that is that is was like a lightbulb finally went off for me after all these years. After having spent the last couple of years in a mastermind (which was a great experience), I understood the value and importance of having a solid foundation and mastery of the fundamentals. I've been talking about this for months (mastering the fundamentals) and will probably continue to talk about it because it's made a HUGE difference. Outcome of Podcast campaign: My investment with Jason wasn't cheap, but it was worth it. It was a $15k investment: they did all the research, created my funnel, ad & worked with me on testing and tweaking. I also spent a couple days in his office with a few other entrepreneurs to dive deep into Facebook advertising. It was really a great experience (a little overwhelming in that there was a LOT of information). My total ad spend before shutting the campaign off was $2500. I got one podcast client ($7k) and ended up with her on a recurring retainer as well (so the campaign itself was paid for). During this time I also signed another podcast client ($6k... the first one included a site makeover and we gave her a discount for being a podcast client), so between those two clients and the retainer I've made my investment back completely. I turned the ads off after a month because it still needed more testing and tweaking (it was converting well, I gained about 900 subscribers in the process) and wanted to step back and evaluate things. During this time I also had website clients I was working with so I felt a little squeezed (hence ending the 'done for you' element of my business). Take away: It is without a doubt worth hiring the right people for mentoring. I got very clear after having worked with Jason that the only type of mentor I would hire was someone who could help me with a tangible piece of my business... I've been thinking a lot about how to approach my 2016 Year in Review episode. Like many other people, this year has felt particularly long. I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that this was a record year for celebrity deaths and crappy politics. Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 1:02:23 Haters, Self-Promotion, & Lead Generation WPCP: 127 https://thewpchick.com/haters-self-promotion-lead-generation-wpcp-127/ Fri, 23 Dec 2016 18:49:50 +0000 https://thewpchick.hytivvx2-liquidwebsites.com/?p=17510 After almost 9 years in this business there are some things I think I'll never wrap my head around. One of those things is the 'haters' out there. Those people who get bent out of shape by something that is absolutely NOT worth the energy they expend. Take a look at the screenshot below, which is what spurred this discussion about haters: WHOA! Settle down there tiger... I've been emailing much more frequently than I ever have before (almost daily). I am a customer of Ben Settle's email players and without a doubt this strategy has worked wonders for my business. I've talked about it a bunch of times on the show so I'm not going to go into detail about it here again, but I will tell you that it works. My engagement rate, sales, affiliate sales, social connections... have ALL improved. Here's another response I got to this same method: I received that email a couple months ago. I'm glad I took a screenshot of it. So now I have a choice... I can focus on the first email (whiners or snowflakes, as Ben Settle calls them), or I can focus on the second email. Clearly I'm going to focus on the second email. We all know the line... "haters gonna hate"... I simply cannot fathom getting so worked up about something like an email. Delete it, unsubscribe from it, don't read it... it's NOT a big deal. What these 'haters' don't realize is their pissy behavior says WAY more about them than it does about me (or you). I'm sharing this story for two reasons: The first reason is because it's kind of funny... and well, if you're going to get bent out of shape and email me it's quite possible I'm going to create content with your email. The second reason is to share that this happens to everyone. The more you put yourself out there, the more you share, the more you show up and do your thing the more likely it is that it's going to rub someone the wrong way. Regardless of your intention. Thank them for the content and comic relief, then go about your day. Self-Promotion This is probably one of, if not THE hardest thing I've had to overcome, work on, deal with... in my business. Like... ever. And I'm going to come right out and say that for some reason, unbeknownst to me, this seems to be a common problem for a lot of women. Men don't seem to have as hard of a time with this concept (I know I'm generalizing, but trust me on this, k?). Take my friend Jon Perez as an example... Jon has no problem promoting his stuff, blasting it everywhere and screaming from the rooftops that he's written something, created something, or is selling something. His biggest challenge is having more time to do it all ;-) . Yet somehow with a full-time job, a wife and two small children he manages to grow his business and continue working towards the lifestyle he really wants. I used to write a post, then share it and be done with it. Every now and then I might share it again or respond to a comment, but for the most part, I figured I did my thing and didn't want to 'spam' people. Let's stop and think about this for a minute. What is the likelihood that everyone who follows you or is connected to you on your social platforms is going to see the ONE message you share at that exact moment? Pretty slim to say the least. I shared this in an email yesterday, but let me go into a little more detail with something I did yesterday and the results I've gotten (so far): First, I went to a couple landing pages for current lead magnets I have and added featured images as well as a twitter & Pinterest image (for Social Warfare) Next I scheduled them to be shared a few times with CoSchedule Then I added them to the 'ReQueue' feature in CoSchedule under the category WPChick Landing pages (right now I have 3 categories for ReQueue- content, podcasts & landing pages) Within a couple hours of doing that I had about 7 opt-ins from ONE of the pages (I scheduled the other lead magnet fo... After almost 9 years in this business there are some things I think I'll never wrap my head around. - One of those things is the 'haters' out there. - Those people who get bent out of shape by something that is absolutely NOT worth the energy they ex... Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 58:44 Running A Business & Marketing Your Niche with Curtis McHale WPCP: 126 https://thewpchick.com/running-a-business-marketing-your-niche-with-curtis-mchale-wpcp-126/ Fri, 16 Dec 2016 15:00:50 +0000 https://thewpchick.hytivvx2-liquidwebsites.com/?p=17448 I have to say that this is the first podcast interview that I've done where we talked about poop. But that's what happens when you talk to a parent of young children (Curtis has young kids)... you just never know where the conversation is going to go. I was pretty excited when Curtis got in touch to be on the podcast. I had subscribed to him sometime in the last year and really loved his writing. Curtis shares his personal journey, lessons learned and doesn't hold back from giving an opinion. That being said, he's also pretty relaxed. Which I'm sure comes from having clear boundaries in his business. We talked about a lot of things (which is why I've included the transcripts below. I'll probably be adding these moving forward, it just depends on time. I'm also thinking of adding time stamps), but one of my most favorite take-aways was the need to set firm boundaries in my business. Curtis does something I've wanted to do for YEARS... he batches his calls on Tuesday. Meaning, Tuesday is the ONLY day he takes and schedules calls. The thought of that makes me feel like I won the time lottery (because somewhere I think that exists... and the beauty of the time lottery is that we're the ones picking the winning numbers. hmm... think there's a blog post in there somewhere). Questions I Asked Curtis Before we get into vetting clients, fill the listeners in on you & your backstory You have an agency & your personal site where you do coaching & work with clients. When did you start doing coaching? When did you realize you needed to get better at vetting clients? Was there a shift or something that occurred in your business that made you put better time & energy into client vetting? When you started your business how were you getting clients? How did the questions that you asked potential clients differentiate you from competitors? What You're Going to Learn How Curtis left a job by telling the owner he'd fire himself Why you don't want to get on the phone too fast How asking better questions up front is key in vetting clients Why telling a client that their idea is bad will gain their trust Why Curtis started batching his calls (hint: it's not rocket science) What his new is about Where to Connect with Curtis Website | Twitter | Book You can click the link below for the full transcript: I have to say that this is the first podcast interview that I've done where we talked about poop. - But that's what happens when you talk to a parent of young children (Curtis has young kids)... you just never know where the conversation is going to g... Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 52:25 Growing Your Audience & Keeping the Faith WPCP: 125 https://thewpchick.com/growing-your-audience-keeping-the-faith-wpcp-125/ Sat, 10 Dec 2016 21:09:48 +0000 https://thewpchick.hytivvx2-liquidwebsites.com/?p=17355 Just when you think you've got a grasp on something... a little dose of reality comes in. In this case, it's a good thing. After last weeks episode on winding the year down and with Christmas quickly approaching, I'm starting to really wrap my head around what I want 2017 to look like for me. I'm still going to do a full 'year in review' episode but I want to share some of the things I'm doing as I wind down the year to prepare for next year. Beyond sitting down with my colored pens, planner of choice and BIG ideas. I've been talking a lot about going back to basics and mastering the fundamentals (maybe I can come up with an acronym for that?). The first two areas I've focused on have been copy and email marketing. When it comes to copy, I haven't even gotten into the sales type of copy yet (think sales pages, ads, etc.). I started simply by working on headlines and paying attention to copy. Let's talk about paying attention to copy first. This whole journey of getting interested in copy began at the very beginning of this year when I decided to sign up to work with Jason Hornung's Facebook advertising agency. I connected with Jason through another friend, had him on my podcast and knew I wanted to work with him. I won't go into detail on that experience in this episode (it was great and I'm planning on having Jason back on the show to do a follow up), but I got a bonus education outside of Facebook advertising. I was impressed with Jason's understanding of ad copy, persuasion, the psychology of copy and what drives people. When he got interested in Facebook ads he jumped in with both feet. He studied copy, advertising and direct response marketing. Books that had been around 30+ years... he created a solid foundation for building his own ad agency. Prior to working with Jason I had zero desire to do any type of copy (or get attempt to get decent at it). But when I heard Jason's story, observed what he did to master his craft all of the sudden I had a different respect for the art of copy. So I started studying and practicing. I tend to be someone who baby steps my way into things or I leap like a lunatic. In this case I baby stepped my way into it (but I'm slowly working my way up to a jog). I've focused on practicing headlines this year. For posts, emails and ads (although I haven't run an ad in a while, more on that in another episode). First thing I did was start paying attention to what headlines spoke to me. What about them did I like, what drew me in to want to read more / learn more. Then when I would go to write my post title I would head over to the CoSchedule Headline analyzer (which I've talked about probably more than you've wanted to hear) and start with my first headline. Holy moly were some of them bad. Then it became a game to see what I could come up with and how I could improve the score. Depending on the topic, I'd write 5 or 6 headlines or sometimes I would stick with something clear (and maybe not very exciting) for SEO purposes. Once I had settled on my headline I'd write my post (which believe it or not I spend way more time editing than I used to). After the post is written the next step is to write a couple more headlines (or use a few that I had written in the headline analyzer) and use the Thrive Headline Optimizer to run some split testing. I have yet to have my original headline win one of those tests (pretty interesting, right?). I can guarantee you that 5 years ago I was not spending this much time on headlines or content. Not because I didn't care, but because I didn't really know better. Which brings me to growing your audience. In the recent survey I did with my email subscribers this is what people most wanted to learn from me. I asked the question "If I were to teach a class, which topic would be most interesting to you?" Which made sense since the other topic people wanted help with the most was lead generation. Just when you think you've got a grasp on something... a little dose of reality comes in. - In this case, it's a good thing. - After last weeks episode on winding the year down and with Christmas quickly approaching, Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 55:24 Your 1 Page Marketing Plan – Interview with Allan Dib WPCP: 124 https://thewpchick.com/your-1-page-marketing-plan-interview-with-allan-dib-wpcp-124/ Mon, 05 Dec 2016 20:57:46 +0000 https://thewpchick.hytivvx2-liquidwebsites.com/?p=17363 Get New Customers, Make More Money, And Stand Out From The Crowd Anyone who has ever written a business plan (or attempted to), knows it's not a simple process (I had originally written not a 'fun' process, but who knows, maybe this is something you enjoy?). I had to write a formal business plan once. And that was enough. It was when I was getting ready to open a physical retail Scrapbook store with a business partner. We found our location and the property management company wanted a business plan. We had plenty of research, examples of products, scrapbooking in general and we had our appointment set. So I went to the office store and bought a software program to write the business plan (this was way back in 1998... so what was available online pales in comparison to what you can find today). It took me 8 hours to plug through the entire 'fill in the blank' business plan. Of course most of what I projected was just that... projections. I probably could have zipped through the program in a quarter of the time had I known the property management company was just going to 'skim' through the business plan (in fact I probably could have written some of my answers in another language and they wouldn't have noticed... but we'll leave that alone). Which is why I was SUPER excited when I came across the 1 Page Marketing Plan by Allan Dib. Once you listen to how Allan changed his own business through creating a 1 Page Marketing Plan you're going to want to jump in and grab the book. Questions I Asked Allan Before we get into the book, can you share your journey here (what you were doing before you launched your business - how you got into marketing) When did you get into online marketing? Let's talk about your book, The 1-Page Marketing Plan. What inspired you to write the book? I love the tagline of the book... "Get New Customers, Make More Money, And Stand Out From the Crowd"... In the book you talk about "the fastest path to money"... which I love, because there's SO much noise online about passion, etc. , which is important, but it's hard to do that work if you don't have any money. What is the 1-page marketing plan? Let's talk about the wrong type of business plan... can you share a little bit about that with the listeners? (strategy vs. tactics) I'm assuming that a lot of people listening to this show are not large agencies... what is one thing they could start implementing today that would make the biggest difference? What You're Going to Learn How Allan went from being a typical geek to writing a book Why being good at what you do doesn't matter (hint: you have to be able to market yourself) How the process of creating a business plan helps your business Why you need to be comfortable with being in business to make money (as well as follow your passion0 How focusing on marketing changed Allan's business Where to Connect with Allan Website | Twitter | Buy the Book Get New Customers, Make More Money, And Stand Out From The Crowd Anyone who has ever written a business plan (or attempted to), knows it's not a simple process (I had originally written not a 'fun' process, but who knows, Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 34:59 Winding Down 2016, Getting Ready for 2017 & Much Appreciation WPCP: 123 https://thewpchick.com/winding-down-2016-getting-ready-for-2017-much-appreciation-wpcp-123/ Thu, 24 Nov 2016 15:00:08 +0000 https://thewpchick.hytivvx2-liquidwebsites.com/?p=17197 I'll be doing a 'year in review' post after Christmas, but thought this was a perfect time to do an episode on winding the year down, getting ready for 2017 and simply saying Thank You to YOU... my audience. You've made it all possible and have encouraged and inspired me to keep going. To say this past year has been a wild ride would be an understatement. I've gone through some massive changes in my business and personal life (and unfortunately for you I've bared my soul in the process). As challenging as some of it has been, it's also all been so very worth it. Winding Down 2016 It's been a long time since I've looked this forward to a year being over. As I write this I realize the reasons for this are hardly the end of the world, they've just been exhausting. Everyone I love is still healthy and happy, no one has had any major losses in their life and my business is doing well. Making the decision to sell my house was a big one, but I knew it was coming. It just came a couple years sooner than I had expected (I don't intend to stay where I am when my son graduates high school in 2 1/2 years. It's been a great place to raise my kids but it's not where I want to spend the rest of my life). I knew I needed to simplify my life (and my business). It's only my son and I at home now and while my house wasn't huge, it was more than I felt like taking care of (especially the yard, even though I loved my pool). It's still crazy to me when I think about the cost of living in Northern California... (specifically close to the Bay Area), but that's for another conversation. Part of winding down for me is getting all my client projects completely wrapped up as soon as possible. These could probably have been done sooner, but of course I'm the bottleneck (I have done a pretty thorough job of cutting expenses this year, which included my project manager). I'd love to have her work with me again but in a different capacity. As I start planning for 2017 I know that to do what I want to do I'm going to need some help in different areas. I guess it would still be project management but it won't be client projects. They'll be my projects. In order to wind the year down and enjoy the last couple weeks of the year (not working, although I'll probably be doing some work, but again, it will be on my projects. No calls, no new projects) I need to close the books on these projects (and I'm sure my clients want that too). So that's step #1. The next step to really winding the year down is to start getting ready for 2017. I've probably gotten at least a couple emails this week and last about planning for 2017 already. I still haven't decided what that will look like for me, but I have an idea of where I'll start. Planning for 2017 When I look at planning anything I tend to work from the end backwards (which I'm sure most people do... you need to have an end goal, right?). The idea of backwards engineering makes more sense for me than any other method. Before I can decide what I want my next year to look like I have to do a good, hard look at what didn't work this year (and what worked well). I can tell you without a doubt that my biggest take away from 2016, as it relates to my business, has been emailing daily. I've been a fan and customer of Ben Settle's for well over a year (I subscribed to his list for about a year before I became a customer). It took me until August of this year to start stepping into his email methods. I jokingly say that it was my 'almost-daily email' because it took me some time to work up to daily (and I admit it, I still miss a day here and there). The benefits have astounded me to say the least. I'm going to keep talking about the daily email process because it works that well and bears repeating! Not only do I feel my writing has improved (now to work on my speaking... haha... omg. I have to stop saying "like" as if I were a 12 year old), I'll be doing a 'year in review' post after Christmas, but thought this was a perfect time to do an episode on winding the year down, getting ready for 2017 and simply saying Thank You to YOU... my audience. - Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 45:18 Managed WordPress Hosting with GoDaddy – Interview with Gabe Mays WPCP: 122 https://thewpchick.com/managed-wordpress-hosting-with-godaddy-interview-with-gabe-mays-wpcp-122/ Fri, 18 Nov 2016 20:50:37 +0000 https://thewpchick.hytivvx2-liquidwebsites.com/?p=17119 Does it seem like there are a plethora of Managed WordPress Hosting options available now? Probably because there is. And I love the fact that GoDaddy has stepped into this space along with everything else they're doing to support the WordPress community. Needless to say I was excited about talking with the person who is part of this movement at GoDaddy and is behind the scenes with one of the absolute best on-boarding processes I've seen when it comes to installing and getting up and running with WordPress. Gabe was a champ and we addressed the 'elephant in the room' so to speak (the elephant that GoDaddy has had a reputation for not being a top hosting choice). I'm a firm believer that regardless of past experiences, when a company makes a concerted effort and improves their products and services it's worth giving them another shot. And can I just say, HOLY MOLY... The efforts by the team at GoDaddy are pretty impressive to say the least. Questions I Asked Gabe: Before we get into all the WordPress & Godaddy awesomeness, can you share how you got into all of this? Apparently you taught yourself how to code while deployed in Afghanistan? Let's address the elephant in the room... GoDaddy has changed a lot (for the better). Before we get into how much has changed and the new WordPress experience you guys are rolling out... what made you guys decide to put more energy into WordPress? Can you share the evolution of WordPress & GoDaddy?  You shared a sneak peek of the new WordPress OnBoarding process for GoDaddy customers... all I can say is wow! It looks fantastic. And I love that you partnered with Beaver Builder (love those guys). Can you explain this new process to the listeners? Plugins: I didn't know you guys had plugins... as in plural. I've used the P3 profiler to test the plugin load on my site. Can you share a little more about your plugins & strategy? Do you have any favorite plugins? What's coming fro WordPress & GoDaddy? What You're Going to Learn: How the change in management at GoDaddy has stepped into the WordPress Managed Hosting space What GoDaddy needed to do fix their reputation What's included in the new on-boarding process New custom themes based on the customers market (ex: if an accountant needs a new site there are accounting themes) Free access to thousands of high quality, royalty free images searchable by category Beaver Builder lite is bundled in the on-boarding process New partnerships coming (Yoast, Ninja Forms & more to come) ... and more features coming to make the initial installation and set up that much easier What GoDaddy does to choose their partners for what comes bundled in the on-boarding process Check out the new GoDaddy on-boarding in the video below: Does it seem like there are a plethora of Managed WordPress Hosting options available now? Probably because there is. - And I love the fact that GoDaddy has stepped into this space along with everything else they're doing to support the WordPress com... Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 37:28 Planning, Producing and Imperfect Action WPCP: 121 https://thewpchick.com/planning-producting-imperfect-action-wpcp-121/ Wed, 09 Nov 2016 21:59:28 +0000 https://thewpchick.hytivvx2-liquidwebsites.com/?p=17069 I've been thinking a lot about processes. My new-found love of the daily email practice (even when my emails aren't daily), has ignited a small fondness for discipline. I say small because the thought of structuring and scheduling my life to the point where everything requires a discipline makes my head hurt (and makes me go into immediate resistance.... don't MAKE me do anything). I'm finding little ways that I can apply this in all areas of my life. For the sake of the podcast though we'll stick with business. Like most entrepreneurs, I enjoy the process of planning and getting excited about the possibilities of what I can do with my business. Taking the time away from the daily tasks often gives us the perspective we need get re-inspired or even clarity on something we've felt stuck on. There's something about changing the routine that feels better (even when we feel like we 'should' be at our desks taking care of the tasks). As much as I like my time to myself, this can be most helpful when doing it with other people (mentor, peers, parters... your dog. Whatever works for you). The extra energy of someone else's excitement and enthusiasm is contagious. They see things you might have missed or can point something out from a totally different perspective that makes you take a second look at something. Then of course there's all the 'stuff' that goes along with planning... pens, calendars, markers (or is that just me), white boards, ideas... lunch with a friend. Kind of like the whipped cream on the sundae, right? Not necessary, but makes it that much sweeter. Here's the problem with planning... You can get STUCK there! (I wish I had some southern phrase or saying about being stuck... somehow it seems like it would just 'fit' here). I've been here myself. Many, many times. I've mapped everything out (I love me some outlines and Gliffy diagrams. I'm not really a mind mapper), created the first few steps then get caught back up in the tasks. Or better yet... I don't get past the first step and get caught back up in the tasks. I'm actually way better at following through on things than I used to be (not a lot of people who know me would say I don't 'get things done', but I make it way more of a chore than it needs to be), but at the end of the day what should get the most attention are the things that can make me MONEY. I'm running a BUSINESS. This isn't a hobby. As much as I love creating content, there needs to be an endpoint, right? (don't go all sideways on me with an altruistic opinion on this... you know what I'm talking about here). I'm going to give you two very specific examples so you can feel like you're getting something tangible and not just joining me for a self-help session (although that could be fun too). Let's look at The WP Chick first. When I decided to change my theme I knew without a shadow of a doubt that my messaging needed to be CLEAR (notice I didn't say clearer, because I can honestly say it wasn't clear at all before). I wanted people to know that when they got to my site they could learn about WordPress and Marketing. I have some re-structuring to do of my content model, but that's more of a 'moving forward' as opposed to going backwards. Meaning, new content that I create should support this model. There are some content pieces I am creating that will be more like cornerstone content (full post on getting started with WordPress, installation, theme, etc. ... because 'duh'... I should have done this years ago) as well as some really in-depth tutorials on certain products (ex: CoSchedule). Then it's a matter of the navigation supporting that direction and having a very detailed 'Start Here' page, clear paths for my visitors and products and services that support that. Oh. And a new, well thought out plan for lead generation (and execution of that plan). Here are the ways I'll be monetizing my brand: I've been thinking a lot about processes. - My new-found love of the daily email practice (even when my emails aren't daily), has ignited a small fondness for discipline. - I say small because the thought of structuring and scheduling my life to the ... Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 1:00:41 SEO Done Right – My Interview with Rebecca Gill WPCP: 120 https://thewpchick.com/seo-done-right-interview-rebecca-gill-wpcp-120/ Mon, 07 Nov 2016 17:44:14 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16970 SEO is something we all know we're supposed to do. So we get the Yoast SEO plugin, name our images with relevant keywords, follow some of the tips from Yoast and aim for the 'green light' from Yoast (I won't get into readability right now, because as I've been testing posting my emails as posts and those never get a decent readability score, but we'll leave that for another conversation). Deciding to re-focus my efforts on a solid content strategy led me back to looking at SEO and what I can do to improve what I'm doing (or simply do it correctly... no shame here, it is what it is). If you're going to take the time to create content, share it and go so far as to do content upgrades (again, that's for another conversation), then isn't it worth it to make sure your content continues to work for you after you've hit publish? Needless to say when I started diving into all of this I knew who I wanted to talk with. Rebecca Gill of Web Savvy Marketing I've been following Rebecca and her team at Web Savvy Marketing (full service agency that also sells their own Genesis child themes) and have had the good fortune of connecting with Rebecca through a mutual friend, Carrie Dils. Not only is Rebecca wicked smart when it comes to SEO but she's pretty fun too (and I've only connected with her through Skype calls. I have no doubt she'd be a blast in person). I'm going to be jumping into Rebecca's DIY SEO Course soon and will be blogging the journey (what I'm learning, data beforehand, etc.). I've been holding off jumping into the course because I know I need to set a certain amount of time aside to implement everything (mind you... the longer I wait the less optimized my site is, right? #assbackwards). Regardless, that will be happening this month (November, 2016). Questions I Asked Rebecca What were you doing before you launched Web Savvy Marketing? Can you share what Web Savvy Marketing is with the listeners? What does your agency do? What made you decide to create a DIY SEO course? We've all heard "SEO is dead"... what's your take on this? If you could recommend people do one thing with SEO, what would that be? You've got an SEO even coming up in January with Cory Miller of iThemes and our lovely friend, Carrie Dils: Is this your first event? What made you decide to host a live event? What's going to be covered? What can people expect? What's coming for you & Web Savvy Marketing in the next year? What You're Going to Learn Why SEO isn't just about getting a 'green dot' on your content (or a green 'Y') Where you should start if you're new to SEO Why SEO & content should be a primary focus for your website What free tools Google gives you and why you should use them ( nothing like a little free data, right?) What SEO can do for conversions on your site and in your business Why you should attend the live SEO event (O.K., this was more me plugging than Rebecca) Where to Connect with Rebecca Website | Twitter | Facebook SEO is something we all know we're supposed to do. - So we get the Yoast SEO plugin, name our images with relevant keywords, follow some of the tips from Yoast and aim for the 'green light' from Yoast (I won't get into readability right now, Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 54:27 My Platform Dilemma, Which Ones I’ve Tried and The Trending Lack of Responsibility WPCP: 119 https://thewpchick.com/platform-dilemmas-and-the-trending-lack-of-responsibility-wpcp-119/ Fri, 28 Oct 2016 20:00:39 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16907 I don't know if this is a distraction or real issue I need to solve. Well... it's probably a little of both. Let me back this up a bit and give you a little 'why' behind this so-called dilemma. I have done my fair share of setting up membership sites with WordPress plugins. I've used most at one time or another but tend to go back to Wishlist because I have a developers license for it (probably not the best reason, but hey, I can be practical once in a while). Last December like much of the rest of the online world I was anticipating the release of "New Kajabi" because I was tired of using different tools and piecing solutions together (we've all been there, right? After you have the website sorted, then you add the membership plugin, set up the payment gateway, connect it to your auto responder, create your landing pages... sheesh. Makes me tired just thinking about it and I know how to do all this stuff). So I jumped in with both feet. Purchasing New Kajabi that is. I had set up a new community (now defunct... I've learned a lot about myself in the past year, but I'll try not to go too sideways with that) and after I got the hang of it things seemed to be O.K., yet for some reason there was a disconnect. Don't get me wrong, it's a beautiful platform...I just found I never really wanted to login and do what needed to be done (and no, I'm not going to hire someone to do that for me). Then I though, I'll move my WordPress Genesis for Beginners course into New Kajabi... start selling that again. Only I didn't. I even moved the Selling with WordPress course Jon Perez and I had done into Kajabi. I still didn't sell it (or promote it). Why? That's the million dollar question, isn't it? Before I get into the mindset issue here, let me share a few of the other platforms and options I've looked at and tested: What is it with Kajabi that I cannot wrap my head around? I don't know... but I'll let you know soon enough because I have a call with them tomorrow. Now that I'm doing these 'daily emails' I'm getting better at posting them as blog posts as well (more on that in a minute). I recently shared something about my decision to NOT renew New Kajabi in December and lo and behold I got an email from someone at Kajabi today asking if I would be up for a chat. They saw I said I was leaving and they wanted to get some feedback and see if they could keep me if it was a possibility. Not too shabby on the customer service side of things if I do say so myself. And here's my two cents on customer service in general: You can ALWAYS find someone who has had a crappy experience with a company and you can ALWAYS find someone who has had an amazing experience with a company (O.K., most of the time. Just play along with me, k?). It's kind of like cars... some people hate a certain brand of car because they had a lemon. You can also find someone who has only bought that brand of car because they've been so reliable. Anytime you have people involved you're going to get a variety of experiences and opinions. This is something you have to decide for yourself. Here's what I'm doing before my call with Kajabi: First, I'm going to go through all their latest updates (they're kind of kicking ass with updates. #justsayin). I'm going to go through the blog (obviously I can't read everything since the call is happening tomorrow), log back into my site and spend some more time with the platform so I come to the call with less than "I don't know what my issue is".... and ideally, get the points of disconnect connected! When I started thinking about the benefits of using Kajabi it's a no-brainer. Everything in one place, I don't need to lay anything out, sales pages, checkout pages... they're all there. It's also ONE place for my customers to login if they've purchased more than one product from me (novel idea. Teachery actually does this too). It will save me $300 a year on Wistia (you get a Wis... I don't know if this is a distraction or real issue I need to solve. - Well... it's probably a little of both. Let me back this up a bit and give you a little 'why' behind this so-called dilemma. - I have done my fair share of setting up membership s... Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 51:33 Social Warfare Plugin for WordPress – Interview with Dustin Stout WPCP: 118 https://thewpchick.com/social-warfare-plugin-for-wordpress-interview-with-dustin-stout-wpcp-118/ Fri, 21 Oct 2016 17:20:54 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16831 Social Warfare is one of those plugins that you need to dive a little deeper into so you can understand what makes it different than all the other social sharing plugins. I had actually bought Social Warfare a while ago, had an issue and forgot to go back to it (issue was nothing major). Like many of you I'm sure, I've tried multiple different social media plugins over the years. Not all the social media plugins have the same result (some are for sharing, some are for connecting, some are for data... you get the picture). Part of making the most of any plugin that you use is understanding the bigger picture/ end result. In this case, it's not just about having options for social sharing on your site. It's about understanding how the different social media platforms work, what works better on different social networks and how you can maximize them for connection and results. Not only did I have a great time talking with Dustin, I learned a ton from all of his wisdom and experience. Questions I Asked Dustin Before we get into Social Warfare, can you share your background with the listeners? How did Warfare Plugins come about? Social Warfare is a popular plugin - what made you guys decide another social sharing plugin was needed? What were some of the challenges & struggles in launching a premium plugin company? What would you recommend to someone in this space? What's your business philosophy? What's on the horizon for Warfare Plugins? Wait until you hear the simple thing that made a huge difference with the Pinterest sharing feature in Social Warfare. Initially Dustin wasn't putting too much attention on Pinterest. Until he learned what he needed to do differently with Pinterest. He implemented a few changes that were recommended to him by friends in the social media space and saw a HUGE difference in the traffic from Pinterest. Within 1 month he saw a 300% increase. A year later he saw 1000% increase in his traffic from Pinterest. What I want to point out with this is we're not just talking about shares... we're talking about traffic. Which every website needs. What You're Going to Learn How Social Warfare doesn't slow down your website The biggest issues Dustin wanted to solve with Social Warfare (what made it different) The human psychology behind Social Warfare (and why it works so well) How Dustin became a well known name and trusted authority in social media and content creation Who influenced Dustin and how his own personal journey was the driving force Why Dustin feels every piece of content should be written for one person Where to Connect with Dustin & the Social Warfare Team Website | Facebook  | Twitter Links From this Episode Warfare Plugins Dustn.TV John Saddington Desk App Pomodoro Technique Social Warfare is one of those plugins that you need to dive a little deeper into so you can understand what makes it different than all the other social sharing plugins. I had actually bought Social Warfare a while ago, Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 50:49 WordPress Page Builder Elementor – Interview with Ben Pines WPCP: 117 https://thewpchick.com/wordpress-page-builder-elementor-interview-with-ben-pines-wpcp-117/ Fri, 14 Oct 2016 21:13:57 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16771 Elementor Page Builder is fantastic! Yep... another front-end visual page builder for WordPress has joined the scene (even though it seems like these tools are coming out overnight, I can assure you these take a lot of time to build and test). Personally, I couldn't be happier. Maybe that's because I'm not a developer... many developers are anti-page builders. That's fine. They're not for them. Page builders have been built for users and people who want to get things to market quicker (and more efficiently). Asking a developer to endorse a page builder is like asking a vegetarian to endorse a hamburger. It's an argument that is irrelevant. And now that we got that out of the way, let's jump into Elementor. When I first saw Elementor I was really impressed with it. It has a really smooth UI, tons of features in the free version and is really easy to work with. Needless to say I was excited to have Ben Pines on the show. I'll definitely be doing a full post, review and video on it... but I didn't want to hold up the interview any longer (I have a list of 7 posts to write, so it will be coming soon). Elementor is created by the team at Pojo.me and Ben Pines is the CMO. Questions I asked Ben Fill us in on how you connected with the team at Pojo? Why did you decide to join the team? Visual builders for WordPress are getting much more popular. What made you decide to create Elementor? What makes this different from other visual builders? I'm sure you have this question before, but Elementor is free. How are you guys going to monetize this awesome tool? Where do you see page builders heading? Features of Elementor You're Going to Love Where to find Elementor & Connect with the Team Website | Twitter  | YouTube Elementor Page Builder is fantastic! Yep... another front-end visual page builder for WordPress has joined the scene (even though it seems like these tools are coming out overnight, I can assure you these take a lot of time to build and test). - Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 47:47 How to Be Your Own Case Study & Profit in The Process WPCP: 116 https://thewpchick.com/how-to-be-your-own-case-study-profit-in-the-process-wpcp-116/ Fri, 07 Oct 2016 15:15:27 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16699 The last few months in my business have been interesting to say the least. And by interesting, I mean good. I've been taking consistent small action in a number of areas in my business and the results are paying off. Every day. And I love it. Before we get into 'How to Be Your Own Case Study & Profit in The Process', let me share a little bit of how this all came up. I've been sharing with you guys a little bit about my affiliate journey on this site and on the Freedom Papers Podcast site (which by the way is getting a complete brand makeover, but more on that in another episode. Let me just say that the decision didn't come lightly but it's one we're really excited about). When I made the decision to start shifting away from service work (and by the way, if you're a current client please know that I'm not abandoning anyone. This is more about who I choose to work with and the type of work I choose to do) I had to step back and get clear on what I DID want to do (yes, this is uber obvious, I know). This is the beauty of making changes. It requires you to find a different perspective on things and fortunately, my personal life provided that perspective. The most obvious choice for me was to increase my affiliate income on The WordPress Chick. You've heard me talk about CPA marketing and affiliate marketing with niche sites and through things that aren't related to this brand, but I've calmed down about that. It's still something I'm going to pursue but not right now. Trust me though, there is a method to my madness. I have to admit that as I acknowledge all this it seems so obvious... the problem with obvious is that you have to be in the right frame of mind to see it. And I wasn't. The changes I was going through in my personal life were a little consuming (I'm sure you guys were as sick of my house move as I was). But hey... that's one of the reasons we run our own businesses, right? So we can live our lives too and not have our schedules dictated by what someone else dictates. Now that all of that is behind me and I'm settled in my new place, I feel a fresh excitement and clarity with everything. Yes everything. My business and my personal life. For the sake of not boring you, I'm going to stick with the business side of things today. Let's talk about Being Your Own Case Study When I got into my first big mastermind group the model was: Create a case study, record a video, drive traffic to an opt-in page so the lead can then watch the case study video, then get them to apply for a strategy session where you can offer a high ticket service. Simple enough, right? But what if you don't have any case studies? You go get them. What I did at the time was send an offer to my list stating that I was looking for case studies (I never said it would be free). I got about 8 responses immediately to my email and I set up the calls. Of the people I talked to I got 3 to sign up for a 3-month coaching program so I could get some results. At the time I also had two other coaching clients so I was gaining traction with what I was doing. From there I created my 'case studies', made my case study video and went into promotion mode. This was in late 2013 so Facebook ads were much cheaper, but it worked. From less than an $90 ad spend I made $500 in strategy session calls ( I charged for the appointment) and $10k in coaching clients (this was paid over a 3 month period). The next time I did case studies was for my Influence Podcasting program (done-for-you podcasting). We produced podcasts for 3 different people (show, show notes, website... all of it) at NO charge so we could get this process down. Only one of those people is still doing their podcast but it's worked extremely well for him (he got a $5k coaching client within the first two months directly from the podcast). We built our systems and ironed out the bugs in doing that. The trick with podcasting is that it's a marathon... The last few months in my business have been interesting to say the least. - And by interesting, I mean good. - I've been taking consistent small action in a number of areas in my business and the results are paying off. Every day. And I love it. Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 51:11 Content Upgrades for List Building, Growth & Sales – WPCP: 114 https://thewpchick.com/content-upgrades-wordpress-creative-process-wpcp-114/ Fri, 23 Sep 2016 20:19:28 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16597 This post is brought to you buy Sitelock I've been talking about Content Upgrades for a while now. Not that I'm an expert by any means, but it's definitely a focus and something that I have first hand experience with. And it works. I don't quite remember when I first tested using content upgrades (it was a while ago)... actually, I think it was when I created a PDF for a tool called Reachly (they don't exist anymore) that was for Pinterest. It was the early days of Pinterest and I was using it quite a bit (more for fun than for marketing) and when I came across Reachly (which I think eventually became Pinerly), I fell in love with it. It had a beautiful interface and was super easy to use. I have no idea what inspired me to create the PDF, but I just got caught up in the moment and went to town. I had heard about content upgrades before but hadn't paid too much attention to them. At the time I had an opt-in offer on my site but was not focused on building my list (more on that in a bit). First, let's talk about what a Content Upgrade Is I know... it sounds pretty obvious, but there are a few different schools of thought on the matter. Some might tell you it is only when you provide more/additional content that is relevant to the content the visitor is reading /consuming. For the sake of keeping things simple, I'm going to say a content upgrade is anything that provides additional value to your visitor. Meaning, if you have amazing content that your reader might want to reference in the future, then providing that content in the form of a downloadable PDF is helping them (I don't know about you but I suck at bookmarking things and coming back to them. I just don't want to do it, so instead I save links and rarely go back to them. I know... doesn't make much sense). Keep in mind though if you're going to copy & paste a post into a PDF for easy reference, simply be transparent about it. Don't position the opt-in like they're getting something more. What I've done in the past is something like "If you want to download this post for easy reference click the button below" (or however I've linked to it). Personally I prefer creating something additional to the original content. It gives you more credibility with your audience and creates an asset for you in the process. Content Upgrades aren't just PDFs I think the default for creating a content upgrade is something in the form of a PDF, usually an ebook or guide. Here are a few other options for content upgrades (and yes, I know some of these are in the form of a PDF but think 'not an ebook'): If you're stuck with what type of content to create for your content upgrades (I'm starting to feel like I'm keyword stuffing here with the amount of times I'm using the word content), take a step back and think about what would help you the most. One thing I find most helpful is an actual example of when something has been used or implemented. Take this podcast & post as an example (this literally just came to me as I was writing this). I'll be including some tools and resources for content upgrades below. I could (can?) easily create a downloadable PDF with links to all the tools, a checklist for the process of creating a content upgrade (which may vary depending on what tool you're using) and maybe a video with one of my favorite tools (this could actually be a product to sell.. hmm... maybe I'll just include the checklist ;-) ). I could also include the audio download of the podcast for easy reference (no point in making someone come back and listen to it, right?). How you do this depends on your own personal creative process. There are times when I get ideas out of the blue (when I'm not at the computer) and I'll send myself a note or save a note in my phone so I don't forget it (the joys of getting older), but most of the time my creative juices start flowing when I'm doing the work. This post is brought to you buy Sitelock I've been talking about Content Upgrades for a while now. Not that I'm an expert by any means, but it's definitely a focus and something that I have first hand experience with. And it works. - Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 55:46 Carrie Dils is Back… Does it Get Any Better? WPCP: 113 https://thewpchick.com/kickin-it-with-carrie-yes-carrie-dils-is-back-wpcp-113/ Thu, 15 Sep 2016 23:15:58 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16567 This episode is sponsored by Sitelock Yes folks, she's back. Holy moly though... a lot has changed with Carrie since she was on the show last (she was episode 7! One of my first guests and I was/am super appreciative of that). Fast forward a few years and knew I needed to have Carrie back on. Her business has exploded (my words) since we spoke last. She's created more products, creates Genesis tutorials for Lynda.com (how awesome is that?), runs the OfficeHours.FM podcast and spent some time working with Crowd Favorite. Oh... and she has added speaker to her list of accomplishments (I haven't had the pleasure of seeing/hearing her speak but I can only imagine it would be awesome). We talked about the disconnect that happens when you want to shift from freelancing to something else. Carrie had some great insight as to why this happens (which tends not to be for one reason only) and of course I had to get a little esoteric with her (I don't know what my obsession with that word is lately). This conversation went in a whole bunch of different directions with this conversation... and let me just tell you... you will be laughing. Carrie is not only uber smart, but she's pretty damn funny (I was laughing throughout the interview and again when writing the show notes). Questions I Asked Carrie Since we last spoke you had gone over to Crowd Favorite and are back working for yourself again. I have a couple questions regarding that shift for you. First, what brought about the decision to work for Crowd Favorite and then what made you decide to go back to working for yourself? When I was on your show last, we talked about changing directions and shifting gears with business. Obviously WordPress isn't going anywhere... where do you see opportunities for people in this space? What do you fee are some challenges with running a profitable business in the WP space? Where do you think the disconnect happens for people who are freelancing and decide they are DONE? Since you've been online for a while, how do you think the landscape has changed and is changing? Where do you want to take your business? Anything you'd go back and tell yourself, say 5 years ago if you wanted to dispel a little wisdom?   What You're Going to Learn  Where the landscape is headed for opportunities in WordPress How to pick your own space within WordPress How funny Carrie is (yes, I thought that was worth adding here) Carrie's thoughts on marketing and where she can step it up How Carrie's podcast, OfficeHours.FM has helped her business The struggle of keeping sponsorship going with a podcast To say I adore Carrie would be an understatement. I'm sure you can tell by listening to this show that it was a ton of fun and Carrie is a wealth of knowledge. Where to Connect with Carrie Website | Podcast | Twitter This episode is sponsored by Sitelock Yes folks, she's back. Holy moly though... a lot has changed with Carrie since she was on the show last (she was episode 7! One of my first guests and I was/am super appreciative of that). Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 55:34 The Merrymaker Sisters: Creating a Profitable Business Around Health & Fun WPCP: 112 https://thewpchick.com/the-merrymaker-sisters-creating-a-profitable-business-around-health-fun-wpcp-112/ Fri, 09 Sep 2016 01:32:11 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16522 This episode is brought to you by Sitelock If I could bottle up the energy of the Merrymaker Sisters I would do it in a heartbeat. I first discovered Emma & Carla Papas (aka, The Merrymaker Sisters), through Dan Norris. I had a feeling based on their name that they were going to be a blast to talk to  (which they were) and I loved what they were doing. I loved their story of getting out of dieting and how it changed their lives. They made a conscious choice to get off the merry-go-round and eat whole foods, stop pushing themselves at the gym and start enjoying their lives more. Novel idea, right? Their story into finding what was right for them (from a health perspective) really helped them shape their business in the process. Their story truly represents the saying "ignorance is bliss". They simply kept going with what was working and continued to share it. Their business continues to grow (cookbooks... a new book coming out in October! and a private membership). Emma & Carla are a huge inspiration and I know you're going to love the interview. Questions I Asked Carla & Emma Before we get into your business today, can you share what you guys were both doing before launching The Merrymaker Sisters?  I'd love to hear more about your story of getting fed up counting calories & fad diets (amen!)... where did you go to start changing things? When did you decide to take your business online? Explain what your business is all about? Your blog & content seems to be a mix of lifestyle, health and business (which I love). How has that worked with your audience? You also launched a podcast... how's that going? What are some of the ways people can work with you? What's on the horizon for The MerryMaker Sisters? What You're Going to Learn How they went from government jobs to their dream business How they came up with the brand (the name took 5 minutes) but the brand took time to grow. What Merrymaker actually means How they've allowed their interests to evolve and shift their business in the process Why they let their audience change and grow with them What allowed them to stop dieting (stepping into Paleo), feel great and start shifting into a whole food diet How they found a new way of living... and how it created a business Where to connect with The Merrymaker Sisters Website | Twitter | Instagram | Facebook This episode is brought to you by Sitelock If I could bottle up the energy of the Merrymaker Sisters I would do it in a heartbeat. I first discovered Emma & Carla Papas (aka, The Merrymaker Sisters), through Dan Norris. Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 51:48 Add More Revenue… Courtesy of Google https://thewpchick.com/google-money-my-favorite-new-tools-going-all-in-wpcp-111/ Thu, 01 Sep 2016 15:50:21 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16472 This episode is brought to you from Sitelock. When I was coming up with this post title and I decided to go with 'Google Money' I had sort of a scary thought. That 'Google Money' probably isn't as far fetched as that sounds, right? I mean... we have bitcoin (although I can't say that I totally understand bitcoin). Then of course if you're a fan of Mr. Robot there's e-coin (I think that's what they call it). But since we don't live in the fictional world of Mr. Robot nor is Google creating its own currency... let's get back on topic. If you've been listening to this show (and hopefully Freedom Papers), you know that one of the things I've been talking about a lot lately is the 'Acres of Diamonds' idea. Meaning, what do you already have that could bringing you income but you're sitting on it or not even aware that it's there? I think as business owners we're so close to our own stuff that we forget to take a step back and look at what we've created or accomplished from a different perspective. I know I did that... and still do at times. But not as often as I used to. So what is Google Money? In this case, it's Adsense revenue. I finally took a harder look at my YouTube channel and have begun doing some tutorial videos again (I got away from them over the last year and a half because I didn't like Camtasia for the Mac and couldn't really get into Screenflow, until the recent update. Which I love). I had always put my videos up on YouTube but never dove into what I need to do to ensure they were optimized and working for me. The videos were working for me in terms of building an audience and people connecting with me but there was so much more I could do. Which is when I reached out to my friend Steve. Who I knew had a much better grasp on YouTube and what I should be doing. I knew I wasn't interested in becoming a 'YouTuber', nor did I want to go buy some huge YouTube course. I simply wanted to do a better job with what I had already uploaded and would be uploading. Remember, I'm not trying to create more work in my life... no more hustle for this chick. So after having Steve take a look at my channel and what I was doing wrong (which was really more about what I wasn't doing) I followed a few simple suggestions of his and went about my happy way. Then got a #notifcationofpayment from Google. I had just received a $120 payment from Adsense for the month (i.e., Google Money). Thank you more please! I have a decent amount of subscribers and views. Of course now I have to go back and tweak all my previous videos, but that's O.K., that's the kind of thing I can do at night when I'm watching TV (I've gotten pretty good at knowing which tasks I can do when). This is a perfect example of 'Acres of Diamonds' in action. My Favorite New Tools You guys know by now that I'm a complete geek about finding tools and plugins to use. As I write this I'm wondering if this is something I should bring up with my therapist?... kidding of course. There are a couple new tools and plugins I've been using a LOT lately and decided it was high time I share them with you. You'll be hearing more about each of these in individual posts or follow up podcasts (I have a couple interviews done with a couple founders), but I didn't want you to have to wait until those posts went live. The first tool I'm having a ton of fun with is actually a WordPress plugin, by one of my favorite companies, Thrive Themes. Thrive Headline Optimizer This isn't a new plugin by any means (although it was released this year, so it's kind of 'newish'), but I've finally started using it more. It's about as easy as it gets too. You enter your headline, then you can enter additional headlines (you can split test two or as many as you'd like). Thrive Headline Optimizer will then alternate showing the headlines to different visitors. You get to decide how long you want to run the test for, This episode is brought to you from Sitelock. - When I was coming up with this post title and I decided to go with 'Google Money' I had sort of a scary thought. - That 'Google Money' probably isn't as far fetched as that sounds, right? I mean... Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 51:30 Plugin Development & Leaving Envato with Gordan Orlic WPCP: 110 https://thewpchick.com/plugin-development-leaving-envato-gordan-orlic-wpcp-110/ Thu, 25 Aug 2016 22:07:21 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16438 This episode is brought to you by my sponsor, Sitelock. Plugin development goes much deeper than the technical side of development. My guest, Gordan Orlic of WebFactoryLtd. went deep with me in this episode. Gordan and I connected through something so simple... and yet not many people do it. Email outreach. Gordan and his team at WebFactoryltd. have been selling their plugins through the Envato Marketplace for a while now and they've made a decision to start transitioning out of that marketplace. When he emailed me to see if I was interested in talking with him of course I said yes... I'm fascinated with the premium WordPress marketplace (plugins, themes and tutorials...it doesn't matter. And it's exciting to see it growing). Gordan and his team have a bunch of plugins over at Envato (CodeCanyon... to be specific) and definitely have their work cut out for them (but it will be well worth it). Questions I asked Gordan Before we dive into WebFactoryLtd., can you share what you were doing before you launched WebFactory? When did you decide to launch WebFactory? What would you recommend to someone who wants to get into premium plugin development? Why are you and your team moving away from Code Canyon? How big is your team? How do you market your plugins? Tell us about the white label plugin side of your business? What You're Going to Learn How the pricing models are shifting in the WordPress premium marketplace Why Gordan & his team are leaving Envato Why paying for support is necessary Who should actually be using Code Canyon The real cost in keeping your plugins up to date and compatible What the process is for moving off of Code Canyon What Gordan really thinks about Code Canyon's support The new WordPress news site Gordan & his team has launched Some of WebFactoryLtd.'s plugins: Google Maps Widget Optin Ninja Security Ninja Super Agency 5 Sec PayPal buttons Core Scanner .... and more! The first plugin that Gordan and his team have moved from Code Canyon is the Google Maps Widget... which makes it super easy (literally... you won't be banging your head against the wall trying to figure this out), to add a Google Map to your website.   Where to Connect with Gordan Website | Twitter | Facebook This episode is brought to you by my sponsor, Sitelock. - Plugin development goes much deeper than the technical side of development. My guest, Gordan Orlic of WebFactoryLtd. went deep with me in this episode. - Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 56:34 Taking Massive Action & My Deciding Factor for Every Project WPCP: 109 https://thewpchick.com/massive-action-my-new-indicator-for-everything-wpcp-109/ Fri, 19 Aug 2016 01:08:58 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16393 This episode is sponsored by Sitelock With my 'anti-hustle' campaign I kind of surprised myself with the title of this post. Well... the "Massive Action" part anyways. I knew I was excited about launching the new show (Freedom Papers Podcast), but I had no idea what that was going to be like. I'm writing (recording) this episode almost exactly a month after the inception of Freedom Papers and I'm floored at how much we've accomplished, which is also why I've decided that what I've learned from this experience over the past month is going to be my new indicator for everything I do online. From Idea to Production First, I apologize if you've listened to the Welcome episode of Freedom Papers, but this little story bears repeating. It's such a testament to trust and patience (something I'm constantly working on. The trust is easier than the patience). I just looked up my initial interview with Jon (Perez) and it was almost 3 years ago exactly (bear with me, I swear I'm not a numerologist but I love these little synchronicities). August 15, 2013. And here we are three years later and we've found "it". Jon and I hit it off right away (how could you not with him, right?) and stayed in touch. We would chat on skype, talk about our businesses and how we could support one another. We knew there was a great chemistry there and wanted to work together. We tried a handful of things to make that happen: Here's the thing though... None of those "felt" right. And I'm here to tell you that what you feel matters. We implemented and took action on each of those tasks, but somehow life always got in the way. Our course (Selling with WordPress) was great, but it felt like a struggle to complete and while I can't really speak for Jon (although clearly I attempt to), our hearts weren't into it. We were looking for that "thing". The big payday, the solution... the ONE thing that would change our trajectory. I have zero regrets about everything we've tried. I know without a doubt that we wouldn't be doing Freedom Papers if it weren't for having tried everything else. Here's the real kicker. If I were to break down each of those other things we did and step back for a minute I can easily tell you that I had a niggly feeling with all of them (in one manner or another). Not that it wasn't right or a quality product, simply that it didn't inspire me to do more, grow it or really stick with it. Those were all things that came after everything else (and trust me when I tell you that the podcast we were doing was a TIME SUCK... the concept was great but the chemistry with the 3rd person wasn't). My guess is that you guys can all say the same thing. Every time you did something that didn't work out you knew in your GUT that you should have let it go sooner. O.K., back to idea to production. We came up with the idea for Freedom Papers on July 18th. When this episode airs it will be exactly ONE month later. In that time frame here's what we've done: Recorded 8 episodes Logo, website & branding: done Email list Produced the intro for the podcast (Jon was the creative brilliance behind that) Launched the show Mapped out our strategy for production (creating systems as we speak) Mapped out our monetization model (I could not be MORE exited) Tracking EVERYTHING we're doing Connected with an amazing transcription service and have transcripts already Are converting the transcripts into a physical newsletter... Freedom Papers (literal papers.. haha) Launching a GiveAway next week for the show ... and a few other things that are TOP SECRET As you probably know by now, I'm not really one to shout from the rooftops "Look what I DID!" (although I have every intention of doing that more). I'm sharing this with you because doing this has been effortless. It has completely taken on a life of its own. Remember when you were a little kid and you could get lost for hour... This episode is sponsored by Sitelock - With my 'anti-hustle' campaign I kind of surprised myself with the title of this post. Well... the "Massive Action" part anyways. I knew I was excited about launching the new show (Freedom Papers Podcast),... Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 51:03 Be An Unlimiter – My Interview with Dallas Hardcastle WPCP: 108 https://thewpchick.com/be-an-unlimiter-my-interview-with-dallas-hardcastle-wpcp-108/ Thu, 11 Aug 2016 17:53:15 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16376 This episode is sponsored by Sitelock. Dallas and I connected about a year and a half ago through the same mastermind. I knew right away that Dallas was 'my kind of people'.... his energy is great, he's super positive and probably one of the most giving people I've met in a while. His story is a bit of a 'tears to triumph' story in that like many of us, Dallas hit rock bottom before getting clear on what he really wanted to do with his business. I hadn't heard Dallas' entire story before this interview. I was honored that he shared it with me (us) and think you're going to be inspired as well as interested in being an "Unlimiter" in your own life. In the beginning of the interview Dallas & I talked about things we both learned through the mastermind together, the value we got and how we think things are shifting in that space. Questions I Asked Dallas What were you doing before your current business? Can you share with the listeners what it is you do today? I know you had some personal struggles & challenges... can you share what that was and what has shifted for you? We all know mindset is important. What made you decide to focus on this? What are some of the challenges your clients face? What does it mean to be an 'Unlimiter'? [Tweet "I lost complete and total control of my brain. @DallasHardcastle"] Through his journey Dallas has created some rituals & daily routines. He has 8 things that he does everyday and he shared those with me during our time together. Resist the interruption of your left brain ( don't let the analytical part of your brain analyze how you're going to do what you're going to do). Think more.. "what can I do" Block out the distractions (more overwhelmed) -quiet your mind. Focus on ONE thing Take & diversify different types of information (mentally rehearsing the days events) Make time to exercise (physical exercise) Exercise your imagination (take time out to do this) Remain as relaxed as possible Practice visualization Become very detail oriented Find out more about working with Dallas and becoming an Unlimiter   This episode is sponsored by Sitelock. - Dallas and I connected about a year and a half ago through the same mastermind. - I knew right away that Dallas was 'my kind of people'.... his energy is great, Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 56:28 E-Commerce Done Right with Chloe Thomas WPCP: 107 https://thewpchick.com/e-commerce-done-right-with-chloe-thomas-wpcp-107/ Fri, 05 Aug 2016 18:30:25 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16330 This episode is brought to you by my sponsor, Sitelock. E-Commerce is one of those things that I've thought about jumping into on and off since I started my business (in 2008), but never pulled the trigger. I started looking into more seriously this past year when I realized I needed to shift the way I was doing business. My overall arching 'theme' has been to stop trading time for money. I've already created some recurring revenue streams but they were more of an after thought than a well planned strategy. Then I hit a wall. I knew it was time to pull the plug on the amount of services I offered and provided (I still do them, but it's more about who I want to work with and whether or not I feel I'm the best person to provide the value someone needs). And then of course there's my motto...."If it's not fun, I'm not doing it." I found Chloe Thomas after getting her recent book, Customer Manipulation (which we talk about in the show). Of course I purchased her other books after getting this one. I'd love to tell you that I've started my new e-commerce site and store, but that's not happening yet. At this point in my life I've finally gotten smart about not taking too much on at once. What I can tell you is when I do launch my e-commerce store I'll be following Chloe's steps! Chloe went deep with me in terms of the brand [Tweet "I'm a big fan of keeping your e-commerce store simple @"] Questions I Asked Chloe There are SO many places I wanted to start with for this interview... but I think it makes sense to start with your background because you have an extensive background in eCommerce. Can you share your background with the listeners? You've worked with people from solo entrepreneurs to big companies. This is a two-part question.... can you give examples of each and share a little bit of their journey/success? Shopify vs. Woocommerce or another self-hosted commerce solutions. Where do you begin? Who should do what? Dropshipping? FBA? Teespring? T-shirts? Gearbubble? Determining profitability of a niche? Is there such a thing as a crowded market? Subscription model? Customer Manipulation: Latest book, what it's about, etc. Best place to connect with you? What You're Going to Learn Where you should start if you want to launch an e-commerce store How the owner of an electronic cigarette e-commerce store has achieved massive success Why you need to have some level of passion for what you're selling (or you may struggle) Which platforms you can use for creating your e-commerce store Why you don't need to have an individual personality behind your store How you can bring in a personality to your store (be humans behind it) without having to be a personal brand   Where to Connect with Chloe Website | Podcast | Twitter | Facebook Links from this episode Chloe's Books: Customer Manipulation eCommerce Master Plan eCommerce Marketing Get the first chapter of Customer Manipulation FREE here! CrateJoy The Automatic Customer (book) GearBubble TeeSpring This episode is brought to you by my sponsor, Sitelock. E-Commerce is one of those things that I've thought about jumping into on and off since I started my business (in 2008), but never pulled the trigger. Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 54:23 WordPress Visual Editors, Hanging with Troy Dean & Freedom Papers WPCP: 106 https://thewpchick.com/wordpress-visual-editors-hanging-with-troy-dean-freedom-papers-wpcp-106/ Fri, 29 Jul 2016 15:03:07 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16285 This episode is sponsored by Sitelock. I've been thinking about doing an in-depth post on WordPress Visual Editors (besides Thrive Content Builder & Beaver Builder, which of course are still my favorites!) for a while now. I'm still planning on it, but thought I would do a podcast episode first to gauge the interest as it's probably going to be a pretty time-intensive piece of content (which is O.K. too, but nothing like getting a little validation first). There are a LOT of WordPress Visual editors on the market now and I expect we're going to see more. I'm going to skip any of the visual builders that have shown up in JV Zoo during the past year because I have no idea if they're going to be around or supported (not that I can guarantee this with the rest of these plugins, but more they'll more than likely be here longer than the JVZoo products). What's interesting is that I've had this conversation a few times now (I think I've talked about this on the podcast before), but with the amount of new tools and options that are starting to show up I thought it was time to revisit this. We'll start by addressing the elephant in the room. Which is whether or not you should use page builders. Obviously you know my answer, but before you write them off, let's talk about when and why you would want to use a page builder. If you look at why the team at Beaver Builder created their awesome plugin it was simple. They wanted to find a way to be more efficient with their client work. They were repeating tasks/work on their client projects and wanted to deploy the sites quicker. So they built the solution they needed. Less time on a project does NOT mean it has less value. You're still providing the client with what they want and you're doing it quicker. I know there are arguments out there about it not being as clean (referring to code here) or as light on the site... but I think we should look at this from the bigger picture. First, most of these tools are getting better and better. Some use the WordPress customizer (for some reason this still isn't my favorite option... I don't know why. I probably need to spend some more time using it, which I will be with one of the latest tools, Elementor). Whether you're building sites for clients or for yourself, here are a few things to consider when deciding if you want to use a page builder: That being said, here are the page builders I'm going to talk about today. Keep in mind this isn't a full list... it's simply the ones I've looked at, used or currently use. If you guys want me to do a full post / video review of these tools let me know. It will take a decent amount of time to complete it, but I'll make it as complete as possible. Thrive Content Builder: O.K., I won't go into details here on this because I've written about Thrive a handful of times and am about to publish a new post with 4 videos on Thrive for you (which I'll link to as soon as it's published, but in the meantime you can checkout a recent post I did where I explained why I use Thrive & Beaver Builder). I primarily use Thrive for landing pages (sales pages, squeeze pages, webinar pages, etc.). But in the post I'm about to publish I used the Thrive Content Builder for the first time in a standard post. Pretty awesome! Beaver Builder: See above. :-) I'll do an updated post on Beaver Builder in the coming months, but in the meantime you can checkout the recent post & video I did on why I use Thrive and Beaver Builder. I use Beaver Builder for creating site pages. One of the most amazing things with Beaver Builder is the community support. There are a lot of 3rd party developers creating add-ons (keeping the core plugin lighter and more streamlined). What I love about this is that the Beaver Builder team is completely supportive and is active within the Beaver Builder Facebook group. Elementor: This is the newest page builder to hit the web and I have to say, I'm LOVING it. Oh... This episode is sponsored by Sitelock. I've been thinking about doing an in-depth post on WordPress Visual Editors (besides Thrive Content Builder & Beaver Builder, which of course are still my favorites!) for a while now. Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 50:28 Chuck Wang on Consulting, Following Your Passion & Robots in Restaurants WPCP: 105 https://thewpchick.com/chuck-wang-on-consulting-following-your-passion-robots-in-restaurants-wpcp-105/ Fri, 22 Jul 2016 06:12:43 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16258 This episode is brought to you by my sponsor, Sitelock. I had the great pleasure of being on Chuck's podcast after we had connected via social media (twitter I think). Talk about a ton of fun (it was also mu first blab). I enjoyed it so much and appreciated how Chuck Wang shows up that I asked him right away to be on my show. Chuck's story is one that I think many people can relate to. He started out on his entrepreneurial journey with a drive for the 'almighty dollar' (his words, not mine) and how he ended up losing it all and turned it around through serving others. Chuck shared a real-life story of one of his companies (who creates podcasting software) and how he helped them streamline their process (most valuable process). I absolutely love the insights and step-by-step instructions Chuck shared with me. Questions I Asked Chuck Before we get into MVP.Consulting, can you fill us in on what you were doing before your launched your current business and podcast? You share some really personal challenges on your About page... what made you decide to share at that level? What gave you the idea to start MVP.Consulting? What's your business model? Why did you decide to launch your podcast? How has the podcast shifted your business? What's on the horizon for you for the rest of 2016? [Tweet "I would rather go small and live a big life than "go big" and live a small life" @TheChuckWang"] What You're Going to Learn How Chuck figured out what he really wanted to do (we talked about passion and finding that) Why he decided to create a human experiment to change the trajectory of his life What it meant to Chuck to be 'soul poor' What his rock bottom was.... after he was chasing the almighty dollar When he had to file bankruptcy and how his life turned around after that Why he needed to hit the 'reset' button on his life How to create your most valuable process Where to Connect with Chuck Podcast | Twitter | Linkedin | Facebook [Tweet "Inspired Works was my gateway drug to get out of that - @TheChuckWang"] This episode is brought to you by my sponsor, Sitelock. - I had the great pleasure of being on Chuck's podcast after we had connected via social media (twitter I think). - Talk about a ton of fun (it was also mu first blab). Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 48:18 Are You Losing Money? The Opportunities & Income Right In Front Of You WPCP: 104 https://thewpchick.com/the-opportunities-income-right-in-front-of-you-wpcp-104/ Thu, 14 Jul 2016 14:02:01 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16149 This post may contain affiliate links This episode is proudly brought to you by my sponsor, Sitelock Sometimes I wonder if I'll stop learning things the hard way. OR... maybe that's simply part of my journey in this lifetime. This episode will probably be a mix of tangible with philosophical, so sit tight, it might be an interesting ride. I've mentioned recently that I'm going through some major changes in my personal life and with my business. I've recently sold my house, which I've owned for 14+ years and was the house my husband and I bought together (he passed away in 2003). I was talking with my mentor/therapist about all these big changes and the attachments to the house and she asked me if it was because my husband and I bought this house together. It wasn't. It was really more that this was MY house. When we bought this house life was full of promises. We had two small kids (they were 4 & 1 when we moved in), I had a new career I was excited about and everything felt like it was in front of us. Fast forward a year and half later and my life as I knew it was gone. Turned upside down in with one tragic accident (stay with me here, it will get better, I promise). This house represented me. My ability to survive... and... here's the kicker... getting to do things however I wanted to. It sounds so odd to say this, but I've often said that losing my husband was easier than a divorce. I've watched people I love go through a divorce and there can be soooo much pain, anger and resentment. And then you have to find a way to navigate a new path with the person you least want to engage with. I never had to share my kids or worry about how someone else was raising them. Deciding to sell my house is sort of like closing a chapter in my life. We've created amazing memories here and it's been an awesome place to raise my kids. But I'm ready... Ready for what? I'm not sure... I will of course be sharing the journey with you. All of this personal sharing brings me to the opportunities and income that are right in front of us, we just don't always see them. I had something 'hit' me on the way home from my last trip up to my therapists and it was something that I think every single person listening can benefit from. "Stop looking outside of yourself." How many times in your business have you made a decision but somewhere along the way (or deep down), you had a niggly feeling it wasn't what you wanted to be doing? I'm not talking about doing things to pay your bills or take care of your family. I think we all get that when you start a business we all do 'what we don't want to do in order to do the things we DO want to do' (say that 10 times fast!). But we're subscribed to so many sites, marketers and people who are doing things bigger and better than we lose ourselves and keep searching for something else. Then I had my HOLY MOLY moment. Let me give you the scenario... I check my email and get a notification from PayPal that Hatchbuck just sent me $70.42 (hatchbuck was my previous email provider prior to switching to Active Campaign. I LOVED hatchbuck... but switched to Active Campaign for a few reasons, which I should get into in another post or podcast). The same day I had shared on social media a new tool called 'Connect Retarget' by Wilco De Kreij. I have a few of his products (all lead gen / Facebook advertising related) and he's a great guy. His products are great, he sticks around (not a JV Zoo product) and continues to develop amazing software. Anywho... I knew I was going to get it (and will probably promote it more in the future, I just wanted to be able to test it and use it first) and thought I'd share it socially one day during the launch. I'm sitting in bed that night writing an email and get a PayPal notification that I just made $98.50 for Connect Retarget. No emails, no ads... just one simple share. So total for that day was $168.92. This post may contain affiliate links This episode is proudly brought to you by my sponsor, Sitelock Sometimes I wonder if I'll stop learning things the hard way. - OR... maybe that's simply part of my journey in this lifetime. Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 58:14 Beaver Builder: They’re BAA-AACK! Updates From The Team at Beaver Builder WPCP: 103 https://thewpchick.com/beaver-builder-theyre-baa-aack-updates-from-the-team-at-beaver-builder-wpcp-103/ Fri, 08 Jul 2016 21:56:35 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16142 Thanks to my podcast sponsor, Sitelock for sponsoring this episode! If you've ever wanted to hang with the guys from Beaver Builder, you're going to love this episode! I'm having a ton of fun doing these follow up interviews with previous guests and I feel like the team at Beaver Builder are old friends... (they're simply awesome people...  in addition to their tool being an amazing page builder). We started the interview off by catching up a bit with what has happened sine our last interview (which was March 6, 2015... btw, I recorded this interview with the guys a couple months before we published). The cool thing about the timing of this interview is that it's right in line with some of the things I've discussed on my last two solo shows (where I discussed getting out of client services). If you haven't listened to the first interview, you're going to want to listen to that which will bring you up to speed on where things are today. We caught up with some of the personal things happening with the guys... Billy and Justin have both moved into new houses a couple hours away from Robby, who is still in the South Bay. A few months prior to this interview the guys made a decision to completely phase out of client services and focus solely on Beaver Builder. We talked about the transition, how they've supported their long-term clients during the transition and how long everything has taken. In April of 2016 Beaver Builder celebrated their two-year anniversary (and this is when they started completely transitioning out of client work... so for those of you who have a product or want to develop a product and get away from services, know that it's going to be a process. It might not take you two years, but it will probably take longer than you think). [Tweet ""It's hard to focus on two separate things at one time... client services or your product" @beaverbuilder"] What You're Going to Learn How the company has grown over the last two years What goes into reaching a million dollars in sales When they stopped client work How the community has rallied around and supported Beaver Builder How they decide which features to add and when What the learning curve has been for them with marketing Questions I asked When did you transition out of client services? What would you recommend to someone who wants to get into the product side of things (themes or plugins)? Having a background in development & design, what was it like to start having to market yourselves? Can you share a tangible marketing experience that worked and one that didn't? How much time to you guys spend doing the different tasks/elements of the business? [Tweet "One of our goals was simple but powerful" @beaverbuilder] This is truly a behind the scenes look at what it's like to build a software company from idea, to minimum viable product to going full time with your product. They've added two full-time support people, 3 contract developers and a designer to the Beaver Builder family. I could not be happier for Justin, Billy & Robby with their well deserved success and growth of this amazing product! If you haven't checked out Beaver Builder, you're going to want to. It's an amazing tool created by even more awesome people. Where to Connect with Beaver Builder Website | Facebook | Twitter Links from this episode Beaver Builder Plugin Beaver Builder Podcast Episode 53 Why We Ditched Our Silicon Valley Offices to Work From Home - Robby McCullough Thanks to my podcast sponsor, Sitelock for sponsoring this episode! - If you've ever wanted to hang with the guys from Beaver Builder, you're going to love this episode! - I'm having a ton of fun doing these follow up interviews with previous guests ... Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 58:12 The Future of WordPress As A Business & Listener Validation WPCP: 102 https://thewpchick.com/striking-nerve-future-wordpress-business-wpcp-102/ Fri, 17 Jun 2016 14:14:04 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16103 Nothing beats unsolicited validation when you're not sure about that feeling in your gut. There's something inside of you that has become more of a push than a nudge, you know without a doubt that this is what you want to be doing... you're just not sure how to get there. Then you take that leap. You put something out there... a message, a post, a product (a podcast) and people reach out to you telling you they feel the same way! That's what happened for me with my last solo episode which was milestone episode 100. I had been thinking about what I wanted to do for that episode for a while. Part of me thought do a big party, live stream, celebrate... whatever. But it's not where I'm at right now and it felt like that would be forcing something or doing something because I thought that's what I should be doing for the 100th episode. I don't want to repeat everything I said in that post or episode, but the message that seemed to resonate with SO many people was when I shared that I was getting out of client services. I have to clarify also that I do have a couple clients I'm still working with and will continue to work with (in case they're reading or listening) but that's only because they're lovely people and I enjoy working with them. Other than that? I'm done. Here's the truth: I have yet to meet a freelancer who doesn't eventually want out of the client work. And... that makes sense! Not simply because there is a frustration level involved in working with clients (because we all know that could be a podcast in and of itself. That would also drain the life out of me and as much as my ego wants to rant, who needs more negativity, right?)... but because as human beings we're hard wired for more. Gone are the days of doing one thing for 30 years (and my guess is that even for the people who did that there was a level of boredom that sank in. They just didn't think they had other options). [Tweet ""I have yet to meet a freelancer who doesn't eventually want out of the client work." @kimdoyal"] We have SO many more options today. And maybe that's part of the problem? Seeing other people going for what they want... doing business the way they want to do business... you question why the hell you're not there as well, right? And I'm not talking about the side they share on social media (as someone who has actively participated in all of that I have to say I am really grateful to be on the other side. I still use social media but I don't get why people feel the need to broadcast every little thing they do. The armchair psychologist in me says there's going to be a bit of a crash for these people. What happens when the 'lights go down' so to speak. But I guess that's for another podcast as well). I received a handful of emails and comments about what I shared in episode 100. Which completely validated that I'm on the right path and headed in the right direction. Even if I've got a nervous pit in my stomach on a daily basis. I know this is something I've got to do. [Tweet ""Seeing other people going for what they want... doing business the way they want to do business... you question why the hell you're not there as well, right?" -@kimdoyal"] The Future of WordPress As A Business Let me get my crystal ball. Can you picture that? I've got my Madame Kim.... errr... Madame Chick turbin on, big chunky rings on my fingers and I'm gazing into a crystal ball. I rub my hands over the ball and give you a "hmm... very interesting"... O.K., I don't know where the bucket that came from, but I had to run with it. First, let's look at what I'm talking about when I refer to WordPress As A Business. These are the business types I'm referring to: WordPress websites WordPress maintenance / hosting WordPress training / teaching / documentation (general) WordPress specialty (think focusing on a specific aspect of WP, ex: Woocommerce, marketing, speed, Nothing beats unsolicited validation when you're not sure about that feeling in your gut. - There's something inside of you that has become more of a push than a nudge, you know without a doubt that this is what you want to be doing... Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 59:27 Launch Your Course Like A Rockstar – Interview with Troy Dean WPCP: 101 https://thewpchick.com/launch-your-course-like-a-rockstar-interview-with-troy-dean-wpcp-101/ Sun, 12 Jun 2016 15:04:52 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16081 You know how there are those people that when you talk with them initially you feel like you've known them forever? And then every time you talk with them you walk away with a smile on your face and know your day was made better because they were a part of it? Yea... that's Troy Dean. Oh... and besides being a great guy and ridiculously fun to talk with, he knows how to create and scale a profitable online business. Which is why I was super excited about talking with him about his latest venture, Rock Star Empires. Yep, a Course about Courses. Troy has plenty of experience (and more importantly data) on creating successful online courses. Many of you probably know Troy from WP Elevation (which started as on open-ended community/membership and shifted to a course) or Video User Manuals (a WordPress plugin that you can install in your site with step-by-step WordPress tutorials). Troy's focus these days is the online education space... and he explains how he transitioned into that (while keeping the other businesses running). And of course we had a ton of fun. [Tweet ""You're constantly reacting to client demands" @troydean"]   Questions I asked Troy You're still running WP Elevation & Video User Manuals: Why step into a course on courses? Time for Money Trap: Discuss What are some of the challenges you see people face when: Taking a course Launching a course What are some key components to creating a successful course? I love that you did a beta run of the program... how did that go? Can you share what's included in the course? [Tweet ""How do you build your online empire by positioning yourself as the Rock Star in your niche?" @troydean"] What You're Going to Learn Why Troy took WP Elevation from an open-ended community to a course he re-0pens a few times a year The one factor that makes a HUGE difference in getting people to commit & complete a course The shocking statistic on course completion (this one kinda blew me away) Why Troy doesn't produce the course until he sells it (I've been there!) How you can successfully launch your own course What Rock Star Empires is all about... Where to Connect with Troy Website | Facebook | Twitter You know how there are those people that when you talk with them initially you feel like you've known them forever? - And then every time you talk with them you walk away with a smile on your face and know your day was made better because they were a ... Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 1:01:08 Episode 100! The Journey So far, Massive Changes & Where I'm Headed https://thewpchick.com/100-episodes-the-journey-so-far-massive-changes-where-im-headed-wpcp-100/ Mon, 06 Jun 2016 19:46:54 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16056 The problem with referencing songs when you're writing is that they get stuck in your head. Like... forever. I just got done writing an email about my friend Troy Dean's new course (Rock Star Empires) and referenced a bunch of 80's music (more specifically, Van Halen songs... because I love Van Halen). Then as I opened my editor to start writing out this post and thinking back to when I launched the podcast, the song "Oh What A Night"... "(late December back in 63... what a very special time for me... " even though I wasn't even alive in 63, the 'Oh What a Night' popped into my head. You're welcome. And for those of you who don't know the song? Go to YouTube... it's by The Four Seasons and is just as awesome song). So for whatever reason... when I start reflecting on the good things in my life, 'Oh What A Night' cues right up. I'm always amazed at how music can transport me back to another time & place in seconds. Or change my mood (lift my spirits, energize me, calm me down or even bring me to tears). But it's not just the music... it's the lyrics. It's the 'why' behind the music. Which brings me to my own 'Why'. I think this is something that as entrepreneurs we find ourselves re-evaluating from time to time (which is a good thing). I am going through some major changes in my personal life (selling my house, probably the last summer my daughter will be living at home, my son has started working, is getting his drivers permit and I have completely closed the door on certain aspects of my business). As my kids start taking off in pursuit of their own dreams, my why has totally shifted. When I started my business 8 years ago my kids were a HUGE part of my 'why' (to provide for them, be home for them, etc.). They're still a part of my 'why' but more from the perspective that I want them to see that you can go for what you want... have dreams, ignore the herd and follow their hearts. The Journey So Far When I decided to launch my podcast a few years ago I did it for the SOLE purpose of wanting to have more fun in my business. I don't think I had quite found my voice in my writing yet and was struggling with being the technician, which was NEVER a goal of mine when I decided to start an online business. I've done a lot of personality tests (one of my favorite tests for entrepreneurs is Roger Hamilton's Wealth Dynamics Test) and I'm never surprised when it reveals that I want to be the 'Star'. So being behind the scenes as a pair of hands (keep in mind this is what my perception was when I started this... and it's all about how you position something) has always been frustrating. In the last three years I've... launched an outsourcing company participated in a high-end mastermind (raced a Ferrari, went ziplining, snorkeling, ATV racing in Mexico, hot air balloon and connected with some wonderful people) gotten into paid advertising traveled more than I had in the previous 5 years (Hawaii a couple times, Mexico, Scotland, France, Las Vegas (not a fan), St. Louis, Park City Utah doubled my email list launched a high-ticket, done-for-you podcasting service done coaching (stopped for a while  and will be doing so grew my team to 12 people gotten one child graduated from HS and off to college (3 more years for the second one) had a friend live with me for a year decided to sell my house (recently) ... enjoyed it all and decided it's time for a new chapter All of this has been a wild ride. Most of it amazing, some of it frustrating and exhausting. The podcast, while not always as consistent as I would like it to be, has been the one constant (along with this brand). And outside of the podcast, there are going to be some massive changes. Massive Changes The first big change is happening in my personal life. I've decided to sell my house. It's a little sooner than I was planning (my son has 3 more years left in high school and I was plannin... The WordPress Chick Podcast - Episode 100 Kim Doyal clean 1:00:49 From Welfare to 8 Figures in Two Years with Giancarlo Barraza – WPCP: 099 https://thewpchick.com/from-welfare-to-8-figures-in-two-years-with-giancarlo-barraza-wpcp-099/ Thu, 26 May 2016 18:52:00 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16028 I first met Giancarlo Barraza at a mastermind event in January, 2014. My first impression of Giani? TONS of enthusiasm, passion and commitment (if you follow Giani on Facebook, which I recommend you do, you'll see what I'm talking about. Because his passion & commitment show in everything he does). Giani left the mastermind we were in together and I've watched his amazing growth over the past two years (and quite frankly have been in awe). I've said it before on the podcast and it bears repeating here... if you can learn how to do paid traffic (and I mean learn how to do it correctly and be profitable), you can succeed online. You simply have to be patient, test and measure everything you're doing. If you haven't heard of CPA marketing (and affiliate marketing), or aren't familiar with it, you will be after this interview. I specifically asked Giani how someone could get started if they were totally new to affiliate marketing and CPA. His answer? You have to listen to the podcast... :-) [Tweet ""You don't need a lot of money to get started, but you have to remember it's a business" - Coach Giani"] Questions I Asked Giani Can you fill the listeners in on what you were doing when we first met? Explain what it is you do (what your business is today). What are some of the challenges and struggles you've dealt with? What is something you see your students doing over and over again that gets in their way? Where would you suggest someone start when they're first getting into paid traffic? [Tweet ""Mostly it's about mindset... it's about how badly you want it" - Coach Giani"] What You're Going to Learn What he sacrificed when he was building his business (everyone thought he was crazy) The one place Giani recommends you get started... and why he recommends getting started this way How he's built his team Why he believes mindset is the most important thing you need when scaling a business What Giani does on Facebook everyday to reach his community Where can someone start with their mindset? [Tweet ""If you train your mind to believe, you can pretty much achieve anything you want" - Coach Giani"]   Connect with Coach Giani Website | Facebook | YouTube Other Episodes You Might Enjoy It's Time to Hack the Entrepreneur with Jon Nastor From Prison to Prosperity - My Interview with Mike Pisciotta Growing a Business with T-Shirts - My Interview with Trey Lewellen I first met Giancarlo Barraza at a mastermind event in January, 2014. My first impression of Giani? TONS of enthusiasm, passion and commitment (if you follow Giani on Facebook, which I recommend you do, you'll see what I'm talking about. Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 46:44 Brandon Lewin, Selling More & SEO WPCP: 098 https://thewpchick.com/brand-lewin-selling-more-seo-wpcp-098/ Fri, 20 May 2016 16:32:32 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=16008 Brandon Lewin. So much to say... so little time! :-) I had the good fortune of connecting with Brandon about a year and a half ago. He reached out to me via social media, we ended up on a Skype call and periodically stayed in touch. We reconnected when I did my first Periscope and I mentioned on that broadcast that I was looking for someone to help me with SEO, backlinks, site optimization, etc. Next thing I knew we were on another Skype call setting up a mutually beneficial business arrangement. I would coach him and he would manage that stuff for me. Best. Decision. Ever. Not only because Brandon is brilliant at what he does, but because he's just a great guy and someone I'm honored to consider a friend. I've referred to Brandon as my 'secret weapon' (on multiple occasions), because he's really helped me shift my content strategy and use of keywords. Now my challenge is simply getting clear on exactly what it is I want to be doing with my business, but we'll save that for another episode. Brandon made a big decision to move his family from Chicago to Austin, TX (yea... he was a little tired of the snow) and has taken massive action connecting and reaching out with other entrepreneurs (something I tend to stay away from where I live... I might head over to San Francisco once in a blue moon, but not often). Not only is Brandon great at what he does (writing, conversions, SEO & strategy), he's a genuine connector. Someone who truly enjoys connecting other people (which makes it super easy to want to make connections for him as well). Questions I Asked Brandon: Before starting your current business, can you let the listeners know what you were doing and how you decided to venture out on your own? Can you share with the listeners what your current business is You work with both online & offline businesses, so this might be a two-part answer. Is there a common mistake you see people making when it comes to SEO or their SEO strategy? (beyond not having one) Let's talk a little about content & SEO. We both know people who spend a LOT on paid traffic, but don't see the value in content. What's your take on this? Where would you start with someone who had an online business but wasn't getting the results they wanted (or any results at all)? Can you give us one strategy that people can start implementing today that will set them on the right path? How can people work with you? What's on the horizon for you? [Tweet ""It was the kick in the ass I needed to get me going" - @BrandonLewin"] What You're Going to Learn: How getting laid off was the best thing that could have happened Why I decided to move my family to Austin, TX from Chicago How he realized he was stuck in the time for money trap Why Brandon considers Austin the "mecca" of internet marketing Why SEO isn't just about looking at Google Analytics How you can take the data and drive it back to 'what the problem' is How you can identify 'low hanging fruit' on your blog and monetize it (or get better results) The role content should play in your marketing strategy [Tweet "You need both content & SEO to be successful" - @BrandonLewin"]   Where to Connect with Brandon Website | Facebook | Twitter Other Episodes You Might Enjoy Cashflow, GooRoos and My First Post on Medium Todd Brown & Conversions: SO Fly Starting an Online Business Today: What I'd do Different Brandon Lewin. So much to say... so little time! :-) - I had the good fortune of connecting with Brandon about a year and a half ago. He reached out to me via social media, we ended up on a Skype call and periodically stayed in touch. Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 57:25 CashFlow, GooRoos and My First Post on Medium WPCP: 097 https://thewpchick.com/cashflow-gooroos-and-my-first-post-on-medium-wpcp-097/ Mon, 09 May 2016 14:06:00 +0000 http://thewpchick.com/?p=15962 In the last solo show I recorded I talked about what I would do different if I were starting my business today. I had also done a similar episode in the very early stages of the podcast (that's the beauty of this type of content, it's always relevant, even though certain elements may change). The one thing I don't think I talked much about (that's my brain for you)... was cashflow. Not from the basic accounting side of things, because I think we all get that concept. More about what you can do to keep if flowing and why it should be your absolute first priority... yes, even before doing the things you "want" to do. Which is a tough one for this chick. Remember, one of my motto's is "If it's not fun, I'm not doing it". But guess what? Earning money IS fun... and creating cashflow in your business can fuel you to pursue more of your passions. Here's where the GooRoo's go wrong... (and I have to credit Ben Settle with the 'gooroo' thing... I'm a fan of Ben's work and subscriber of his Email Players newsletter... and would LOVE to have him on the show. But that's another episode). Having been in this business for a while now, I've seen a boat load of product launches, huge courses and high end masterminds (I've invested in all of them). What you DON'T see very often is the one thing that will help you get closer to being able to invest in all of those things. Creating consistent cashflow in your business. Why? Because it's not super sexy and most people don't focus on what they need (what would really solve their problems), they focus on what they WANT. And gooroo's and marketers alike know this. But that's where the magic really starts to happen. When you can give someone what they want while solving what they need, it's a win-win, isn't it? Here's what I wish I had grasped early on. Get the cashflow set up FIRST, then pursue the fun stuff... the passion projects... whatever you want. Not that I necessarily would have listened. :-) I can be a little stubborn at times... but eventually I come around (ever wonder at what point we stop learning things the hard way?). When the money obstacle is removed (meaning you can cover all your expenses and still have the quality of life you want), you're in a completely different mental space to produce the things that make your heart sing. Before we move onto gooroos, let's talk a bit about what you can do to get the cash flowing. And I'm going to be a little firm with you here... but trust that it's coming from the right place, O.K.,? Please don't start with a bunch of "yeah, but..." reasons as to why you can't/don't/won't take the steps to get cash flowing in your business. Been there, done that. And it's bullshit. You absolutely can get these things going. And I get it that there are a lot of different types of business models out there, but you'd be hard pressed to find one of these things below that doesn't apply  or can't be implemented in your business. Even it if requires a few tweaks. I'm simply going to bullet point them here but go into more detail in the podcast itself. Cashflow opportunities: Do all of these take time? Absolutely. But the time is going to pass whether you implement these things or not. I have a friend who used to think of affiliate marketing from the perspective of "yea, but the money doesn't come in for at least 30 days". True. But in 30 days from now that is going to make a difference, right? It makes me cringe a bit when I think of the amount of affiliate income that I've left on the table over the past 8 years. It was that old, tired story of not wanting to offend anyone or seem cheesy because I was promoting affiliate offers. WTF?! And all of this can be chalked up to perception. Most people are too busy thinking about themselves to worry about what you're doing. Moving onto GooRoos The second I saw Ben Settle write that I was hooked. In the last solo show I recorded I talked about what I would do different if I were starting my business today. I had also done a similar episode in the very early stages of the podcast (that's the beauty of this type of content, it's always relevant, Kim Doyal The WordPress Chick clean 50:33